Monday, 24 July 2017

How to deal with a disastrous Scottish naming tradition!

It's the middle of summer, and a bit quiet here in Scotland just now, so here's a wee advert to remind you of the importance of those all important historic naming conventions - and how to deal with them when they don't suit your taste!



(Also available at https://youtu.be/ibuLgsVcQUY)

For those not in the know, Irn-Bru is Scotland's national soft drink, and there has been a decades long tradition of humorous adverts for the product!

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Scottish Monumental Inscriptions website revamped

The Scottish Monumental Inscriptions website has been revamped at https://www.scottish-monumental-inscriptions.com.

The site provides images and transcriptions of monumental inscriptions from graveyards across Scotland. As well as new CDs being added over the next week, there are also additional links and general information now available on the site. Amongst the new additions is a page listing family history researchers who might be able to help.

Please note that as part of the change, if you were registered on the old site, you will need to re-register for the new version.


(With thanks to Helen Grant)

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Saturday, 22 July 2017

Latest British Newspaper Archive additions

The following newspapers have been added to the British Newspaper Archive (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk) over the last 30 days:

Irish Independent
1898, 1903-1908

Southern Echo
1891-1896, 1909-1910

Limerick Chronicle
1832-1868

Sheffield Daily Telegraph
1915, 1918-1932

Mid-Ulster Mail
1891-1892, 1894-1898, 1900-1909

Fulham Chronicle
1914-1918, 1939-1940, 1942, 1944-1945

Herts & Cambs Reporter & Royston Crow
1898

East Anglian Daily Times
1894, 1905

Torquay Times, and South Devon Advertiser
1869-1871, 1873-1892, 1894-1895, 1897-1910

Hampstead & Highgate Express
1888, 1900-1910

Knaresborough Post
1868-1878, 1880-1898, 1900-1905, 1912

Galloway Gazette
1891-1892, 1895, 1952

Forfar Dispatch
1912-1952

Kidderminster Times and Advertiser for Bewdley & Stourport
1874, 1900

Londonderry Sentinel
1885, 1925

Carluke and Lanark Gazette
1906-1913, 1915-1951, 1953

Buchan Observer and East Aberdeenshire Advertiser
1863-1917

Brechin Advertiser
1879-1898, 1925-1957

Northern Constitution
1877-1899

Southend Standard and Essex Weekly Advertiser
1873-1875, 1878, 1880-1896, 1898-1905, 1907-1909

Wharfedale & Airedale Observer
1880-1881, 1884-1885, 1888-1889, 1899-1907, 1909-1910

Kilburn Times
1876, 1881-1882, 1885, 1892, 1901-1909

Isle of Wight County Press and South of England Reporter
1884-1887, 1889, 1900-1902

Eastern Evening News
1882-1883, 1885, 1900-1904

Ilford Recorder
1905

Islington Gazette
1908-1910

Boston Guardian
1938

Northwich Guardian
1861-1879, 1882-1896, 1898-1910

Nottingham Journal
1893

Lancashire Evening Post
1953-1957

Shields Daily News
1875-1876, 1879

Brighton Gazette
1877, 1889

Ballymena Weekly Telegraph
1896-1902

Weston-super-Mare Gazette, and General Advertiser
1901-1902

Staffordshire Chronicle
1887-1892, 1894-1896

Yarmouth Independent
1895, 1938

Skegness Standard
1922

Wigan Observer and District Advertiser
1890, 1902-1910, 1912-1918

Rothesay Chronicle
1875-1877, 1879-1882, 1884-1892

Glasgow Evening Post
1884, 1892-1893, 1895

Catholic Standard
1933-1936, 1938-1949, 1951-1957

Kentish Mercury
1872-1884, 1898-1910

Montrose, Arbroath and Brechin review; and Forfar and Kincardineshire advertiser.
1935-1951, 1953-1957

Ballymena Observer
1951-1957

Watford Observer
1879-1886, 1898-1900

Irish Society (Dublin)
1919

Nelson Leader
1929, 1931-1937, 1940-1949, 1951, 1953-1957

Yarmouth Mercury
1880

Hackney and Kingsland Gazette
1902-1909

Bradford Daily Telegraph
1878, 1897

Hexham Courant
1877

(Source: https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/titles/recently-added/30days)

Use subscription discount code BNAJULY30 to get a 30% discount from a subscription - offer ends July 23rd 2017.

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Controversial BritainsDNA company passes into history

BritainsDNA has ceased trading. Hallelujah.

The DNA testing company, which led some to believe that a new field of 'genetic astrology' was being invented, traded under several names, including BritainsDNA, ScotlandsDNA, and YorkshireDNA. Whilst its DNA results themselves were not contentious, the company was never a stranger to controversy in terms of how those results were interpreted, with outlandish claims about who people were descended from. For a while it seemed to be the darling of the British media sector, not least because of the close connections to the sector that one of its founders had with the industry. At one point it even claimed to have found 'Eve's grandson' in Scotland, and nine people related to the Queen of Sheba (see http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/2014/06/bbc-story-featuring-britainsdna.html).

Effectively challenging many of the company's more extraordinary claims was University College London, which set up a page to document and refute some of the nonsense at https://www.ucl.ac.uk/mace-lab/genetic-ancestry, whilst industry commentators such as Buzzfeed News's science correspondent even ran a headline stating "This DNA Ancestry Company Is Telling Its Customers “Mostly Total Bollocks” About Their Ancestors".

The full announcement of the company's final demise is told at http://notjustsheepandrugby.blogspot.co.uk/2017/07/britainsdna-thing-of-past.html.

(With thanks to Debbie Kennett via Facebook)

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Tracing your Dublin Ancestors 4th edition now on sale

From Flyleaf Press (www.ancestornetwork.ie/flyleaf/):

Flyleaf Press has published a completely updated Edition of Tracing your Dublin Ancestors, a guide to all of the records available for tracing families in Dublin city and county, and how to find them and use them to trace your ancestry. The title is available from Flyleaf or (to bookshops and giftshops) through Argosy Books. www.argosybooks.ie. We also have similar guides for 10 other counties.

Tracing your Dublin Ancestors - Fourth Edition
by James G Ryan and Brian Smith
ISBN: 978-1-907990-31-1
Soft-cover; 230 x 143 mm
€14 retail

Tracing your Dublin Ancestors is filled with information on what the records contain, and where they can be accessed. It is well illustrated with useful maps; with examples of the types of records to be found; and with relevant background material. It also sketches the social history of the county and how this history has affected the keeping and survival of records. There is also a comprehensive index.

This is the latest in a series of county guides published by Flyleaf Press. These include guides for Kildare, Limerick, Sligo, Galway, Cork, Clare, Westmeath, Kerry, Limerick, Roscommon, Mayo and Donegal. Reviews of previous editions have said: ‘Well-written, concise and easy to follow. It lists the records available for Dublin city and county, including individual church records…. A most valuable contribution to Irish genealogy’ Irish Family Links; and ‘…An impressive amount of information intelligently presented’ NY Genealogical & Biographical Record.

(With thanks to Jim Ryan - a review copy is being sent to me, so I hope to blog further about this in a few weeks time when I return from Australia!)

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Friday, 21 July 2017

England and Wales, Long-Term Workhouse Inmates, 1861

Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk) has recently added a new collection of workhouse related records for England and Wales, as sourced from information gathered by Peter Higginbotham.

England and Wales, Long-Term Workhouse Inmates, 1861
http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=61439
Source: Long-Term Workhouse Inmates, 1861, Peter Higginbotham, workhouses.org.uk


Here's the relevant part of the description:

On 29th June 1860, The House of Commons ordered that the name of every adult pauper in each workhouse in England and Wales, who had been an inmate for a continuous period of 5 years or more, was to be recorded. The report was printed on 30 July 1861 and listed 14,216 adults. When compared with the total workhouse population of approximately 67,800 adult workhouse inmates (excluding vagrants) the percentage of long term inmates was just over 21%.

For each union, the list shows:

'The Name of every Adult Pauper who has been an Inmate of the Workhouse during a continuous Period of Five Years'.
'The Amount of Time that each of such Paupers shall have been in the Workhouse'
'The reasons assigned why the Pauper in each case is unable to maintain Himself, or Herself'.
'Whether or not the Pauper has been brought up in a District or Workhouse School'.

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Somerset records added to FindmyPast

The latest additions to FindmyPast (www.findmypast.com):

Somerset Baptisms Index
Our new collection of Somerset Baptisms is an index to more than 2.1 million parish baptisms held at the Somerset Archives. The collection consists of transcripts spanning the years 1501 to 1917 and covers baptisms performed in 496 parishes across the county.

Somerset Banns Index
The Somerset Banns Index contains over 258,000 transcripts of original parish records. Banns are the public announcement in a Christian parish church of an impending marriage between two specified persons.

Somerset Marriages Index
Find out when and where your Somerset ancestors were married with over 1 million transcripts spanning nearly 500 years of the county's history. The records found in this collection are a combination of transcripts created by Findmypast from original registers held by the Somerset Archives and transcriptions gathered and created from original records by the Somerset & Dorset Family History Society.

Somerset burials index
Were your West Country ancestors were laid to rest in Somerset? Search more than 1.5 million transcripts to discover when your ancestor died and where they spent their final days.

British Newspapers
Over 1.1 million articles and 9 brand new titles have been added to our collection of historic British Newspapers this month. New titles now available to search include:

Herts & Cambs Reporter & Royston Crow
Knaresborough Post
Galloway Gazette
Forfar Dispatch
Fulham Chronicle
Hampstead & Highgate Express
Kidderminster Times and Advertiser for Bewdley & Stourport
Buchan Observer and East Aberdeenshire Advertiser
Carluke and Lanark Gazette

(Further details and links via https://blog.findmypast.co.uk/findmypast-friday-2462591504.html)

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Free access to Ancestry's UK military records

Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk) is offering free access to its UK military holdings over this weekend, via http://www.ancestry.co.uk/cs/free-access - here is the blurb:

Our military history is on our minds at the moment, with the Passchendaele centenary and the new Dunkirk film. Don't miss this chance to track down your ancestors who served their country in WWII, WWI and earlier conflicts. From 21-24 July, get access to millions of records and find the military men and women in your family—all completely free.

*Access to the records in the featured collections will be free from 00:01 BST 21 July until 23:59 BST 24 July, 2017. To view these records you will need to register for free with Ancestry.co.uk with your name and email address. We will then send you a username and password to access the records. After the free access period ends, you will only be able to view the records in the featured collections using an Ancestry.co.uk paid membership. To see a full list of the records in the featured collections please click here (i.e. http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/group/uk_military_collections).

Good hunting!

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Not every document is on paper!

My wife and I returned from a short three day visit to Germany yesterday, where we stayed in Düsseldorf and visited Cologne (Köln). Whilst there I came across many forms of commemoration for people and events, including a statue of Otto von Bismarck (Germany's first chancellor), a sculpture commemorating the rebuilding of Düsseldorf after the Second World War, plaques commemorating all sorts of historic developments in the city, lovelocks on Cologne's main bridge, coats of arms, streetsigns, and a fairly new one on me, 3D printed sculptures of people, either as commemorative items in their own right or for putting on wedding cakes!

Just a wee reminder folks that not every document of use for family history research is on paper or parchment - and I wonder who is recording all that genealogical data available on the lovelocks...?!


Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Discover Scottish Land Records (2nd ed) - now on sale

My latest guide book is now out, an updated second edition of my popular Discover Scottish Land Records title. Some of the links in it have been refreshed, some further context added, and new areas for research included, such as the usefulness of Scotland's ultimus haeres records for family history research.  Here's the blurb from Gould Genealogy's website., from where you can buy the book - an e-edition will be available shortly, and hopefully localised availabilty from Canada and the UK in due course.

Media: BOOK - paperback, 64 pages
Author: C. Paton
Year: 2017
ISBN: 9781925323696
Other: 2nd ed., b&w photos, glossary, further reading, index
Publisher: Unlock the Past

This updated guide from family historian Chris Paton takes a look at the complicated records concerning land and property based research in Scotland.

For centuries property transactions within the country were governed by feudal tenure, a system which was abandoned in England and Wales in the Middle Ages, but which continued in Scotland until 2004. But feudalism was not the only method by which land was held, with Udal Law, duthchas, leasehold and more competing as forms of tenure across the country at different times.

Connected with the rules surrounding property transactions were those associated with the inheritance of land and heritable estate, all of which are explained in great detail. From sasines to skat, from retours to precepts of clare constant, and from apparent heirs to heirs apparent, this concise guide will help you get to grips with one of the most exciting and useful topics within Scottish family history.

Contents:
Introduction to first edition
Introduction to second edition
Acknowlegements
1. Where were they?
- The vital records
- Parish records
- Census records
- Street directories
- Phone directories
- Valuation rolls
- Burgh assessmernt rolls
- Earlier tax and valuation rolls
- Newspapers
2. A Sense of place
- Maps
- The Statistical Accounts of Scotland
- Other gazetteers
- Forfeited estates
- Other National Records of Scotland collections
- Historic Environment Scotland
3. Land tenure
- Scottish laws
- Feudalism
- Charters
- Instruments of Sasines
- Protocol books and the Secretary's Register
- The Registers of Sasines
- Locating the records
- Pre-1781 sasines minute books
- Liferents and trusts
- Registers of Scotland
- Registers of deeds
- Tacksmen
- The end of feudalism
- Other forms of tenure
4. Inheritance
- Apparent heirs
- The Services of Heirs
- Precept of Clare Constat
- Types of heir
- Ultimus hacres
Glossary
Further reading
Index

To purchase a copy, please visit https://www.gould.com.au/discover-scottish-land-records/utp0283/. And if you are wondering where the cover image was taken - it was at Kinlochleven! :)

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Thursday, 20 July 2017

Deceased Online adds Crewe burial and cremation records

From Deceased Online (www.deceasedonline.com):

Cheshire East Records Now on Deceased Online

Cheshire East's cemeteries and crematoria are managed by Orbitas Bereavement Services, a company owned and controlled by Cheshire East Borough Council. There are now 130,000 records from the Crewe office available on www.deceasedonline.com. Records for the Macclesfield area have been digitised and will be released later in the year.


The area contains many towns associated with the industrial revolution and particularly textile mills; many specialising in silk, such as Congleton, Macclesfield, and Sandbach. Crewe is famous as one of the centres of the nascent railway industry of the early 19th century, as well as a centre for Rolls Royce engine manufacturing. Cheshire is also famous for its cheese, and Nantwich has hosted the International Cheese Awards since 1897.

The cemeteries in Cheshire East are the final resting place of many notable Victorians, such as William Hope, paranormal investigator and pioneer of 'spirit photography'. Paranormal investigator Harry Price proved Hope's methods fraudulent by marking Hope's photographic plates, and finding the resulting spirit photographs to be presented on unmarked plates. Hope formed the Crewe Circle Spiritualist group and after his death in 1933 was buried in Crewe cemetery.

All records for the Crewe area's six cemeteries and one crematorium are available on Deceased Online. These are:
• Congleton Cemetery – 500 records from 2004 to 2015
• Coppenhall Cemetery - 10,400 records from 1861 to 2015
• Crewe Cemetery - 51,750 records from 1872 to 2016
• Nantwich Cemetery - 11,150 records from 1870 to 2015 *
• Sandbach Cemetery - 3,950 records from 1935 to 2015
• Weston Cemetery - 1,150 records from 1908 to 2015
• Crewe Crematorium - 52,100 records from 1954 to 2009

The records comprise digital scans of all burial registers or cremation indexes and grave details for each of the graves and their occupants.

* There is an historic lack of accuracy in some of the original register entries of older records in Nantwich cemetery. There are some duplicated records but as we have no way of ascertaining the correct grave details in these cases, we have included them for the completeness of the data.

Other local records in the region available on Deceased Online:
Bolton Council (Greater Manchester/Lancashire)
Cheshire West and Chester
East Staffordshire Borough Council
Trafford Council (Greater Manchester/Lancashire)
Lancashire (removal of graves and tombstones records from The National Archives)
Manchester and Lancashire Family History Society (memorial inscriptions)

(With thanks to DeceasedOnline)

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Monday, 17 July 2017

NLS completes 25 inch OS English county maps coverage

The National Library of Scotland has completed its coverage of the 25 inch county map series for England (1841-1952), with some 85,279 sheets now available online.

The completely free to access maps are available to consult at http://maps.nls.uk/os/25inch-england-and-wales/index.html.



(With thanks to the NLS via Twitter)

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Sunday, 16 July 2017

Westminster Roman Catholic records added to FindmyPast

The latest records release from FindmyPast (www.findmypast.com):

Over 121,000 new Roman Catholic Parish records covering the Diocese of Westminster are available to search this Findmypast Friday, including:

England Roman Catholic Parish Baptisms

Over 94,000 records covering parishes throughout the Catholic Diocese of Westminster have been added to our collection of English Roman Catholic Parish Baptisms. Each record will include both a transcript and an image of the original document. The amount of information in each transcript may vary depending on the age of the original record, its legibility, and the amount of detail recorded by the parish priest at the time of the event. Images may provide additional information about your ancestor such as the names of their godparents, the minister who performed the baptism, and the parent's residence. Some registers will even include notes about the individual's marriage.


England Roman Catholic Parish Marriages

Just under 9,000 additional Westminster records have been added to England Roman Catholic Parish Marriages. Every result will display the original sacramental register and a transcript of the vital details which may vary depending the age and condition of the register itself. Most transcripts will list the couple's full names, role, date of marriage, marriage location and father's names.


England Roman Catholic Parish Burials

New Westminster records have also been added to our collection of English Roman Catholic Burials. Transcripts will reveal when and where your ancestor was laid to rest, the year in which they were born and the year of their death.


England Roman Catholic Parish Congregational Records

Did your ancestor receive confirmation? Were they a benefactor of the parish? Explore more than 16,000 new additions to our collection of Roman Catholic congregational records to discover your ancestor's relationship with their local Catholic parish.


England Roman Catholic Parish Registers Browse

All of this week's new additions have also been added to the England Roman Catholic Registers Browse function. The entire collection now contains 756 volumes from the Birmingham and Westminster Archdiocesan Archives spanning the years 1657 to 1907.

(Original release at https://blog.findmypast.co.uk/findmypast-friday-july-14th-2458806930.html)


Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Friday, 14 July 2017

TheGenealogist releases Northumberland parish records

From TheGenealogist (www.thegenealogist.co.uk):

TheGenealogist launches over 1.3 million Parish Records for Northumberland

TheGenealogist has expanded its UK Parish Records collection with the release of over 1,363,000 new records for Northumberland. These records make it easier to find your ancestors’ baptisms, marriages and burials in these fully searchable records that cover the ancient parishes of the northernmost county of England. Some of the records can take you as far back as 1560.
In this release you can find the records of:

903,314 individuals in Baptisms, 157,329 individuals in Marriages and 302,378 individuals in Burials

Use these records to find the names of ancestors, parents’ forenames (in the case of baptisms), father’s occupation (where given), abode or parish, parish that the event took place in, the date of the event, in the case of marriage records, the bride’s maiden name and the witnesses’ names.

In these records you can find Grace Horsley Darling, the famous lighthouse keeper’s daughter who saved the crew from a shipwrecked paddle steamer. She was born on 24th November 1815, at her grandfather's cottage in Bamburgh in Northumberland and was baptised the following month.

Grace was the daughter of William and Thomasine Darling who, when only a few weeks old, was taken to live in a small cottage attached to the lighthouse on Brownsman Island, one of the Farne Islands off the coast of Northumberland.


Her father ran the lighthouse there and she is famed for participating in the rescue of survivors from the shipwrecked paddle steamer Forfarshire in 1838.

It was carrying sixty two people when it foundered on the rocks, split in two, the survivors managed to clamber onto Big Harcar a rocky island and were spotted by Grace looking from an upstairs window. She and her father rowed out in a four man boat for a distance of about a mile and between them rescued the nine survivors.

Search these and millions of other records on https://www.thegenealogist.co.uk

Credits:- Grace Darling rowing out to sea, to save sailors from a shipwreck, in a furious storm. Colour wood engraving by E. Evans after C.J. Staniland - Wellcome Library, London

(With thanks to Nick Thorne)

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

FamilySearch records update


 The latest online records from FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org) this week include:

Collection
Indexed Records
Digital Images
Comments
286762
286762
Added indexed
records/images to an existing collection
2480472
0
Added indexed records to an existing collection
1458383
0
Added indexed records to an existing collection
12575
0
Added indexed records to an existing collection
22347
0
Added indexed records to an existing collection
747018
0
Added indexed records to an existing collection
500743
0
Added indexed records to an existing collection
78964
0
Added indexed records to an existing collection
484319
0
Added indexed records to an existing collection
1133
0
Added indexed records to an existing collection
0
5039
Added images to an existing collection

(With thanks to Paul Nauta via email)

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

100 years since women gained the Westminster vote

Commemorating 100 years since women gained the vote at Westminster:

Vote 100: Parliament celebrates 100 years of the vote in 2018
www.parliament.uk/vote100

On 14 July, the 159th anniversary of Emmeline Pankhurst’s birthday, with the suffragette flag flying over Portcullis House, the Houses of Parliament officially launches Vote 100 – a year-long programme of events celebrating a century of women’s voices in Parliament.

2018 will see the anniversary of landmark moments in the journey towards universal suffrage and the representation of all citizens in Parliament.

Throughout the year Vote 100 will celebrate these major milestones, and the contribution of women to politics in the UK, with a series of events, exhibitions and educational programmes.

The celebrations will begin on 6 February 2018 to mark 100 years since the Representation of the People Act passed, allowing women to vote for the first time.

Nicky Morgan MP, Vote 100 Advisory Group Member, said:

“As a female MP it is a real honour to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the first women in Parliament. We owe so much to the pioneering women and brave campaigners who bequeathed us our most valuable inheritance – the right to the vote. I hope women and men alike will join us in commemorating that right, and the courageous citizens who fought so hard and for so long to make it possible for women to vote.”

Baroness Maddock, Vote100 Advisory Group Member, said:

“Women have made an immeasurable contribution in both Houses of Parliament but this has only been possible because of those who broke down the barriers. Since women were allowed to sit in the House of Lords, there have been six women Leaders; three women Government Chief Whips; and the first two Lord Speakers have both been women. But work must continue to ensure the gender balance is equal. I encourage men and women across the UK to reflect on the achievements of the suffrage movement whether that’s through holding an EqualiTea or by visiting the Voice and Vote: Women’s Place in Parliament exhibition. ”

Other anniversaries in 2018 include:

100 years since women first had the right to stand as an MP
100 years since the 1918 election, the first where all men over 21 and some women over 30 had the vote
100 years since the election of the first female MP
90 years since women first had the same electoral rights as men
60 years since the creation of life peerages allowing women to sit in the House of Lords

As part of Vote 100 Westminster Hall, the oldest part of Parliament, will host a major summer exhibition “Voice and Vote. Women’s Place in Parliament”. It will immerse visitors in women’s experiences of Parliament from the 18th century to the present day, through sound, image and text. The exhibition will examine the 72 year campaign for the vote as well as the experiences of Nancy Astor MP and Baroness Wootton of Abinger, who were the first women to sit in the House of Commons and the House of Lords, in addition to the more than four hundred woman who serve as Parliamentarians today.

In a partnership with Royal Holloway University, Parliament will also launch a ‘massive open online course’ (MOOC) on women, Parliament and the vote, which will tell the story of the campaign for women’s suffrage in detail.

To mark the anniversary of the 1928 Representation of the People Act, in which all citizens were given the right to vote on an equal basis, tea parties will take place across the UK between 30 June and 2 July 2018. EqualiTeas will be an opportunity to get individuals and communities together to share, debate and celebrate their right to vote, over a cup of tea and slice of cake!


Anniversaries in 2018

February 6: Representation of the People Act (1918)
All men over 21 and women over 30 received the vote if they were either a member or married to a member of the Local Government Register, a property owner or a graduate voting in a University constituency.

April 30: Life Peerages Act (1958)
Allowed the creation of life peers, including women. Women were able to sit in the House of Lords for the first time.

July 2: Equal Franchise Act (1928)
Gave women the same access to the vote as men.

November 21: Parliament (Qualification of Women) Act (1918)
Gave women over 21 the right to stand for election as an MP.

December 14: 1918 General Election
Some women over 30 and all men could vote in a General Election for the first time. The first female MP was elected.


Overview of key events and activities

Voice and Vote: Women’s Place in Parliament
A landmark exhibition in Westminster covering women’s attempts to influence Parliament, the campaign for votes for women, and the representation of women in the Commons and the Lords.

EqualiTeas
A festival of events that aim to share, debate and celebrate democratic equalities on the anniversary of men and women first receiving equal access to the franchise.

Women, Parliament and the Vote
Developed in partnership with Royal Holloway University, Parliament will launch a ‘massive online open course’ which will tell the story of women’s campaign for the vote.

UK Parliament Week 2018
Vote 100 will be an important element of UK Parliament Week 2018, and partners will be encouraged to reflect upon it when planning events for the annual festival that engages people from across the UK, explores what Parliament means and empowers them to get involved.

Your Story, Our History
Building on our successful Your Story, Our History series, a range of new films will show how people’s lives have been impacted positively by increased representation at Parliament.

Talks and Tours
Throughout the year we will run a programme of themed events, tours and talks that explore the journey to universal suffrage and women in Parliament today. Our programme will include activities for adults and families visiting with children.

“People’s Parliament”
The “People’s Parliament” workshops for visiting schools give students from 7--18 an opportunity to immerse themselves in a re-enactment of the 1908 Women's Freedom League protest in the House of Commons, stimulating consideration of public intervention, campaigning and pressure groups. This workshop will be available for booking from September 2017. Further announcements of special educational events may be forthcoming. School groups can also visit www.parliament.uk/teach and search under ‘suffragettes’ for related learning.

Further information about the programme is available at www.parliament.uk/vote100. To keep up to date with events and get regular updates follow the hashtag #Vote100.

(With thanks to Maev Mac Coille, House of Commons Communications Office; image description: ‘The disgraceful scene in the House’, Daily Graphic, 1906
Copyright Notice: © Parliamentary Art Collection WOA Ref. Coll.)


Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Thursday, 13 July 2017

Early Mormon Missionaries database

Press release from FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org), an agency of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints:

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH, 13 July 2017, FamilySearch announced the release of a fun new feature that connects you with ancestors of Utah pioneers who served missions in the first hundred years of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The Early Mormon Missionaries database, announced at RootsTech 2016 by Elder Steven E. Snow, is a collaborative effort between FamilySearch, the Church History Library, and the Church’s Missionary Department to match FamilySearch users’ family trees with the database to identify early missionaries. If the feature finds a match, you will see digital images of your missionary ancestor’s call and acceptance letters, mission journals, and possibly even photos. FamilySearch is a free service. (Find and share this announcement online in the FamilySearch Newsroom).

Over 1.1 million LDS members have connections to the information in the database, but you don’t need to be a Mormon to have ancestral ties to the global Church. The Early Mormon Missionaries database includes records of over 40,000 Church missionaries that served between 1830 and 1930. The feature contains resources like bios, setting-apart information, call letters, mission journals, registries, and photos. You can also contribute additional information your family might have about your missionary ancestor.

To see if you are a descendant of early Mormon missionaries, visit the Early Mormon Missionaries database. You will view a personalized page that reveals the identities and stories of any of your early missionary ancestors.

The calls to serve and corresponding letters of acceptance give insight into the lives of these faithful people. Most of them lived in poor circumstances and were married with children. Many had travelled long distances and were establishing their homes when they received their letter to serve a mission. In their written replies to the Church, examples of great faith mixed with incredible hardships were depicted. Some explained their financial problems and requested time to clear up any debts or finish school or to deal with family urgencies. But they accepted in impressive numbers, serving in the US and abroad. Some served two or three times while their faithful wives and families held down the home front during already difficult times.

Julia Samuelson Curtis (Western States Colorado Mission (March 1905–November 1906) was a young widow when she faithfully accepted her call to serve a mission in 1905. Her late husband was called to serve a mission in Samoa but died unexpectedly. Following his death and the stillborn birth of their child, she felt the desire to serve the mission he was unable to fulfill and requested to serve in his stead. (Read her letter to President Joseph F. Smith requesting a mission call to Samoa.) She served in Colorado, where she would be ultimately introduced to her future (second) husband, a widower in similar circumstances who had previously served in the same mission.

Online visitors will find an interactive map showcasing the expansion of LDS missions from 1830 to 1930 and highlighting where ancestors served, video stories from designer Rhona Farrer and others talking about their family’s missionary heritage, and a link to fun family activities about missionary service.

“Taking historic databases, like the Early Mormon Missionary collection, and mapping them against FamilySearch users’ family trees online to create new, interesting, personalized discoveries for them has increased users’ engagement in their family history dramatically,” said Allison Hadley, FamilySearch campaign manager for the project.

(With thanks to FamilySearch by email)

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Ancestry releases Anglesey electoral registers

Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk) has released electoral registers for the Welsh island of Anglesey, covering the period from 1832-1977. The collection has been sourced from Archifau Ynys Môn / Anglesey Archives, Anglesey, Wales, and can be accessed at http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=61449.

The collection does not include records for the war years 1916, 1917, and 1940, 1941, 1942, 1943 and 1944.

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Tuesday, 11 July 2017

Coming Soon - Discover Scottish Land Records (2nd ed)

Coming soon from Unlock the Past (www.unlockthepast.com.au):

Discover Scottish Land Records (2nd edition)

This updated guide from family historian Chris Paton takes a look at the complicated records concerning land and property research in Scotland. For centuries property transactions within the country were governed by feudal tenure, a system which was abandoned in England and Wales in the Middle Ages but wich continued in Scotland until 2004. But feudalism was not the only method by which land was held, with Udal law, duthchas, leasehold and more competing as forms of tenure across the country at different times.

Connected with the rules surrounding property transactions were those associated with the inheritance of land and heritable estate, all of which are explained in great detail. From sasines to skat, from retours to precepts of clare constat, and from apparent heirs to heirs apparent, this concise guide will help you to get to grips with one of the most exciting and useful topics within Scottish family history.

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Sunday, 9 July 2017

Scottish Research Online course in September

My next Scottish Research Online course from Pharos Teaching and Tutoring Ltd kicks off on September 11th, and lasts five weeks. Here's the blurb:

Scotland was first to have major records digitized and offer indexes and images online. It has also been a leader in placing resource information on the World Wide Web. This course describes the major sites, the types of information and data that they offer, the forms in which databases are presented and how to analyze results. You will learn to lay the foundations for searching a family, how to select best resources and what to do next either online or in libraries and archives.
Lesson Headings:
  • Scotlands People, Family Search, Ancestry, FreeCen: content, comparison, assessment
  • Essential Maps and Gazetteers
  • Civil Registration and Census Research Online
  • Searching in Church of Scotland Registers Online
  • Scottish Wills and Inventories Online
  • Take It From Here

Note: it is recommended but not required that students in this course sign up for the basic search option, 30 units/seven days, at ScotlandsPeople (cost is seven pounds)

Each lesson includes exercises and activities; a minimum of 1 one-hour chat s See How the Courses Work.

STUDENTS SAID: "I particularly liked the fact that the course didn't just focus on the well-known BMD resources available, but on a much wider range of websites, including many which give extremely useful background information on the geography and history of the localities where our ancestors lived."

"a very knowledgeable Instructor"

Relevant Countries: Scotland

This course is offered twice annually.

Course Length: 5 Weeks
Start Date: 11 Sep 2017
Cost: £49.99

To sign up to the course, please visit https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Saturday, 8 July 2017

Irish Lives Remembered issue 37 now freely available online

The latest edition of Irish Lives Remembered is now available, free to read online at https://irishlivesremembered.ie.

Included in this issue are features on:
  • Miss Grace Elizabeth Cotter of Rockforest, County Cork, by Patrick Roycroft.
  • The Girls and Women who Emigrated in Steerage Class, by Maureen Wlodarczyk.
  • Women and DNA, by Maurice Gleeson.
  • Photodetective: "An Elegant Dublin Lady from the Late 19th Century", by Jayne Shrimpton.
  • Liz Rushen, Australian Historian of Irish Women Immigrants, is Interviewed by Fiona Fitzsimons.
  • The Surname "Burke".By Paul MacCotter

and more...

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

FindmyPast latest additions

The following collections have been added to FindmyPast (www.findmypast.com):

Dublin City Ordnance Survey Map 1847

Explore 33 fascinating Ordinance Survey maps covering Dublin at the height of the Great Famine. This large-scale government map, broken up into numerous sheets, displays the locations of all the streets, buildings, gardens, lanes, barracks, hospitals, churches and landmarks throughout the city. You can even see illustrations of the trees in St Steven's Green.


Ireland, Maps and Surveys 1558-1610

Delve through 68 beautifully illustrated early Irish maps digitised in full colour from the National Archives series State Papers Ireland. These m
aps were created during the reigns of Elizabeth I and James I and assisted the English in the plantation of Ireland - a time when the English crown confiscated Irish lands and redistributed them to English planters or settlers. Most of the land confiscated had previously belonged to Gaelic leaders in Munster and Ulster.


Wiltshire Wills and Probate Index 1530-1881

Explore more than 130,000 Wiltshire Wills and Probate records in this free index. Each record consists of a transcript that will reveal your ancestor's occupation, if they left a will and when they left it.


London Marriage Licences 1521-1869

Search thousands of London Marriage records spanning 348 years of the city's history to determine whether your ancestor's were married by licence. The records are presented in a Portable Document Format (PDF). You can search the whole text of the document with the full text option. This will allow you to search by name, parish, or even other facts such as occupation or father's name. Records will typically reveal your ancestor's occupation, marital status, father's name, previous spouse's name (if widowed) and corresponding details for their intended spouse.


Further details are available at https://blog.findmypast.co.uk/findmypast-friday-2454309522.html

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

One month to the next Unlock the Past roadshow!

In a month's time I will be heading back out to Brisbane to help kick off the next Unlock the Past roadshow event, entitled Researching Abroad: Finding European and British Isles Ancestors. As such, I've recorded a short hello and introduction, which you can view at https://youtu.be/Hb3gWczlbBc or embdedded below:



For further detail on the programmes in Brisbane, Auckland, Sydney, Melbourne, Canberra, Adelaide and Perth, please visit www.unlockthepast.com.au/events/researching-abroad-finding-british-isles-and-european-ancestors.

Hopefully we'll see you there - it should be good craic!!!



Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Edinburgh 1544: Virtual Time Binoculars

Smart History, a virtual spin out from the University of St Andrews, has created a digital reconstruction of Edinburgh from the early 16th century, as part of a project called Edinburgh 1544: Virtual Time Binoculars. Here's the blurb:

In May 1544 an English army gathered on the outskirts of Edinburgh. Led by the Earl of Hertford (brother to Henry VIII’s third wife Jane Seymour) the English had orders to ‘burn Edinburgh town’, and leave the Scottish capital ‘so razed and defaced’ that ‘there may remain forever a perpetual memory of the vengeance of God’.

Fortunately for the residents of Edinburgh, the English failed to fully achieve their aims. A combination of Edinburgh’s natural geographic advantages, and determined defence by gunners based at the Castle, frustrated much of the English efforts. After harrying the Scottish capital for less than two weeks Hertford’s forces withdrew.

The English claimed that following their assaults on Edinburgh ‘neither within the walls nor in the suburbs was left any one house unburnt beside the innumerable bodies, pillages and spoils that our soldiers brought from thence’. The reality was probably more complicated. Although Holyrood and the Canongate seem to have sustained significant damage, the extent of destruction in the heart of the burgh of Edinburgh is debatable.

The Edinburgh 1544 Project reconstructs the appearance of the Scottish capital on the eve of these momentous events. Inspired by a drawing in the British Library made by the English military engineer Richard Lee (who accompanied Hertford’s expedition, and took part in the sack of Holyrood), the reconstruction visualises the historic burghs of Edinburgh and the Canongate as they may have appeared just before Hertford’s forces arrived.

You can explore the groundbreaking reconstruction of sixteenth-century Edinburgh both via this website, and our Virtual Time Binoculars, a new virtual reality app for iOS and android devices.

For more on the project, and to download the app, visit www.smarthistory.co.uk/Edinburgh1544/index.html - and view a short preview video on the site or below:




(With thanks to the National Library of Scotland, via Twitter)

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course commences Sept 11th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.
For details on my Scottish & Irish genealogy guide books, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.
For my genealogy research service, please visit http://www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk.

Saturday, 1 July 2017

Details of new Presbyterian records on ScotlandsPeople

The National Records of Scotland (www.nrscotland.gov.uk) has updated its press release on the additional records for dissenting Presbyterian congregations added to ScotlandsPeople (www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk) in June 2017 (see the original release announcement on The GENES Blog at http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/2017/06/more-presbyterian-kirk-records-join.html).

The following are the additions (CH3 numbers in brackets refer to a volume's original accession number at the NRS):

Births and baptisms
  • Abernethy Associate (Antiburgher) Congregation, United Presbyterian, United Free South (CH3/687/1–3), 1744–1855
  • Banff, Free Church, High United Free (CH3/1303/29), 1844–1850
  • Bellshill Relief Church, United Presbyterian, West United Free, St. Andrew's Church of Scotland (CH3/1037/9), 1764–1833
  • Brightons Parish Church, Polmont Free Church (CH3/1196/1), 1843–1855
  • Chirnside Reformed Presbyterian Congregation, later Free and West United Free Church (CH3/336/1), 1839–1855
  • Comrie Associate Congregation (United Presbyterian, United Free Comrie East) (CH3/608/1), 1791–1826
  • Edinburgh, Martyrs' Reformed Presbyterian Church, Free Church, United Free, united with St John's as Martyrs' and St John's, 1909 (CH3/1198/1), 1805–1855
  • Glasgow, John Street Relief Church, United Presbyterian, United Free, Church of Scotland (CH3/806/12), 1822–1855
  • Hamilton, Brandon Street, Second Relief Church, United Presbyterian, and United Free (CH3/996/6), 1831–1842
  • Howgate, Antiburgher, Associate Session, United Presbyterian and United Free Church (CH3/1363/11), 1750–1759, 1800–1826
  • Irvine, East Church, Trinity, United Presbyterian, United Free (CH3/1288/13), 1820–1854
  • Kincardine (Burgher), United Presbyterian, United Free, Church of Scotland (CH3/1018/23), 1853–1855
  • Kirkcaldy, Pathhead Antiburgher Church, Associate Session (Linktoun), United Presbyterian (CH3/1144/6–8), 1760–1855
  • Kirkcowan, United Secession Church, United Presbyterian, United Free and Church of Scotland, Danson Memorial (CH3/871/5), 1838–1842
  • Kirriemuir, Associate, United Original Secession Church (CH3/1398/2), 1824–1843
  • Leith, Relief Church, United Presbyterian Junction Road, United Free, Church of Scotland (CH3/728/32), 1825–1855
  • Macduff Free/United Free/MacDuff Gardner Church of Scotland (CH3/1416/1), 1843–1855
  • Newton Stewart Relief Church, United Presbyterian, United Free York Road (CH3/1371/1), 1791–1845
  • Nigg (Antiburgher) Associate, United Secession, United Presbyterian, later Chapelhill United Free and Church of Scotland (CH3/1433/12), 1767–1855
  • Paisley, Reformed Presbyterian, Oakshaw Free Church, Oakshaw West United Free, and Church of Scotland (CH3/751/21), 1809–1853
  • St Andrews Hope Park Church (CH3/1584/28), 1829–1838
  • West Linton Associate Congregation, later United Presbyterian, West Linton and Newlands United Free Church and Trinity Church of Scotland (CH3/307/1), 1748–1795

Banns and marriages
  • Aberdeen (St Andrew's Street), St Paul's Relief Church, United Presbyterian, United Free and Church of Scotland (CH3/927/10), 1807–1855
  • Aberfeldy Free Church, later United Free and Church of Scotland, Breadalbane (CH3/453/2), 1851–1855
  • Airdrie, South Bridge Street, Second United Associate Congregation, (Graham St) Relief, United Presbyterian, later United Free and Church of Scotland (CH3/793/9), 1833–1843
  • Alness Free Church, United Free (CH3/750/2), 1843–1855
  • Alyth Associate Session (Antiburgher) United Presbyterian, United Free South (CH3/15/3), 1820–1855
  • Arbroath First United Associate Congregation, (Antiburgher) North Grimsby Church, later Princes Street United Presbyterian, United Free, Church of Scotland (CH3/964/21), 1823–1855
  • Ardeonaig Free Church, United Free, Church of Scotland (CH3/1243/3), 1847–1855
  • Auchencairn, Free Church, United Free, St John's Church of Scotland (CH3/1199/4), 1844–1855
  • Ayr Cathcart Church (CH3/753/7), 1832–1855
  • Barr Free Church, United Free, Angus Memorial, Church of Scotland (CH3/757/1), 1843–1855
  • Biggar Associate (Burgher) Church, North, Moat Park, United Presbyterian, United Free (CH3/1248/1), 1761–1810
  • Biggar Relief congregation, later South United Presbyterian, Gillespie, United Presbyterian and United Free, Church of Scotland (CH3/1249/6), 1837–1852
  • Brechin Relief Session, later High Street and Bank Street United Presbyterian Churches and Bank Street United Free (CH3/439/15), 1832–1855
  • Bridge of Teith Associate Congregation, United Presbyterian, United Free, Church of Scotland (CH3/48/21), 1758–1766
  • Brightons Parish Church, Polmont Free Church (CH3/1196/1), 1843–1855
  • Campsie West United Free Church Kirk Session (CH3/1041/3), 1845–1855
  • Carluke, Kirkton United Presbyterian Church (CH3/459/1), 1832–1855
  • Chirnside Reformed Presbyterian Congregation, later Free Church and West United Free Church (CH3/336/1), 1839–1855
  • Coatbridge – Dunbeath Relief Church, later United Presbyterian and United Free (CH3/524/9), 1838–1855
  • Cockburnspath and Oldhamstocks Free Church, United Free and Church of Scotland (CH3/58/14), 1846–1855
  • Cromarty Free Church, later United Free and Church of Scotland (CH3/586/10), 1843–1847
  • Dallas Free Church, United Free, Church of Scotland (CH3/1131/8–9), 1846–1855
  • Dunblane Leighton, Associate Session, United Presbyterian, Leighton United Free (CH3/90/1, 10), 1758–1790, 1836–1855
  • Dundee – Hilltown Free (CH3/341/29), 1851–1855
  • Dunfermline, Associate (Burgher) Church, Queen Anne Street, United Presbyterian, United Free, Church of Scotland Erskine (CH3/568/16–17), 1740–1754, 1799
  • Dunfermline, St Margaret's United Free Church Kirk Session (CH3/1232/33), 1825–1850
  • Durness Free Church, United Free, Church of Scotland (CH3/852/2), 1843–1855
  • East Kilbride, Relief Session, United Presbyterian, West United Free, and Church of Scotland (CH3/1001/1), 1792–1855
  • Edinburgh – Cowgate, United Associate Congregation, Infirmary Street United Presbyterian, Mayfield Secession Church, United Presbyterian, Fountainhall Road United Free and Church of Scotland (CH3/1014/10), 1844–1855
  • Edinburgh – Lady Glenorchy's Free Church, United Free, North Church of Scotland (CH3/723/18), 1843–1855
  • Edinburgh – Martyrs' Reformed Presbyterian Church Kirk Session, FC, United Free, united with St John's as Martyrs' and St John's, 1909 (CH3/1198/1), 1805–1855
  • Edinburgh – Corstorphine Free Church, United Free and St Ninian's Church of Scotland (CH3/514/10), 1846–1855
  • Edzell Free Church, later United Free and Church of Scotland (CH3/543/4–5), 1837–1855
  • Enzie Free Church (CH3/314/9), 1844–1855
  • Eyemouth United Secession Church Kirk Session, United Presbyterian, East United Free (CH3/1235/1), 1841–1855
  • Falkirk, West, Relief Church Kirk Session, United Presbyterian, United Free, Church of Scotland (CH3/1459/16), 1843–1855
  • Glasgow – Caledonia Road UP Church (CH3/399/8), 1844–1855
  • Glasgow – Regent Place United Associate (CH3/354/26), 1836–1840
  • Glasgow – Eglinton Street United Free Church (CH3/769/20), 1842–1855
  • Glasgow – St Stephen’s West Kirk Session (CH3/162/18), 1838–1850
  • Greenock Associate Session Church Kirk Session, Crawfordsdyke (Cartsdyke) (CH3/1378/1), 1779–1788
  • Huntly Free Church (Strathbogie New Church, 1840–1843), Strathbogie United Free and Church of Scotland (CH3/620/14), 1840–1845
  • Inch Free Church, later United Free, Castle Kennedy, united with Inch Church of Scotland in 1931 (CH3/557/1), 1843–1855
  • Insch Free Church, later United Free and East Church of Scotland (CH3/175/5), 1843–1855
  • Inverkeithing Associate Congregation, later United Presbyterian, United Free and St John's Church of Scotland (CH3/452/1), 1753–1775
  • Inverurie Free Church, later United Free, West Church of Scotland (CH3/556/2), 1844
  • Kelso Reformed Presbyterian Congregation (CH3/667/1), 1824–1853
  • Kilmarnock (Crookedholm) Reformed Presbyterian Church Kirk Session, Martyrs Free (from 1876), United Free, Church of Scotland (CH3/1318/1), 1803–1855
  • Kilmaurs Associate (Antiburgher) Congregation, Smyton United Presbyterian, United Free and Glencairn Church of Scotland (CH3/193/1, 3, 21), 1740–1760, 1780–1855
  • Kilmun Free Church, United Free, later Kilmun and Strone United Free and St Andrew's Church of Scotland (CH3/505/8), 1842–1855
  • Kirkcaldy, Bethelfield (Burgher), United Associate Congregation, later United Presbyterian, United Free and Church of Scotland (CH3/846/2), 1834–1855
  • Kirkcowan, United Secession Church, United Presbyterian, United Free and Church of Scotland (CH3/871/5), 1838–1855
  • Kirkliston Free Church United Free, Church of Scotland (CH3/1008/4), 1843–1855
  • Knockbain Free Church Kirk Session, Munlochy, United Free, North Church of Scotland (CH3/1200/1), 1843–1855
  • Lanark, Broomgate/Bloomgate First Relief Church Kirk Session, United Presbyterian, United Free (CH3/1449/1), 1845–1855
  • Leith, Mariners Free Church, St Ninian's United Free, Church of Scotland (CH3/448/2), 1842–1855
  • Leith, Relief Church, United Presbyterian Junction Road, United Free, Church of Scotland (CH3/728/33), 1823–1855
  • Letham United Associate Congregation, later United Presbyterian (CH3/213/1), 1839–1855
  • Lybster Free Church, United Free, Church of Scotland (CH3/882/1), 1844–1855
  • Macduff Free, United Free, Macduff Gardner Church of Scotland (CH3/1416/1), 1843–1855
  • Marnoch, Free, United Free, later New Marnoch Church of Scotland (CH3/1492/28), 1843–1850
  • Maybole Cargill Church Kirk Session (CH3/869/8), 1846–1853
  • Methven Associate Session, later United Presbyterian and United Free (CH3/444/3), 1846–1855
  • Montrose, First United Associate (Antiburgher) Church Kirk Session, Mill Street United Presbyterian, St Luke's United Presbyterian, United Free, Church of Scotland (CH3/1177/10), 1745–1840
  • Montrose, St John's Free Church, United Free, and Church of Scotland (CH3/1178/19, 23), 1825–1849
  • Monzie Free Church (CH3/567/2), 1843–1855
  • Morebattle (Gateshaw) Associate Session, United Associate Session, United Presbyterian, United Free (CH3/520/1–2), 1775–1855
  • Morebattle Free Church, United Free and St Aidan's Church of Scotland (CH3/526/10), 1847–1855
  • Muthill Free Church (CH3/694/2), 1843–1855
  • Newton Mearns Kirk Session (CH3/227/1), 1746–1760
  • Newton Stewart Relief Church, United Presbyterian, United Free York Road (CH3/1371/1), 1807
  • Nigg (Antiburgher) Associate, United Secession, United Presbyterian, later Chapelhill United Free (CH3/1433/12), 1767–1855
  • North Ronaldsay Free Church, United Free, Church of Scotland (CH3/1101/4), 1848–1855
  • Ordiquhill Free Church, United Free, Ordiquhill and Ordiquhill, Cornhill and Church of Scotland (CH3/1045/5), 1845–1855
  • Paisley, Reformed Presbyterian, Oakshaw Free Church, Oakshaw West United Free, and Church of Scotland (CH3/751/20–22), 1809–1855
  • Perth (North) Associate Session (Antiburgher), United Presbyterian United Free and Church of Scotland (CH3/507/1, 9), 1740–1855
  • Perth, Free Middle Church, United Free, Church of Scotland (CH3/1283/13), 1845–1855
  • Rathillet Kirk Session (Burgher), later United Presbyterian, United Free and Church of Scotland (CH3/1565/4), 1764–1855
  • Rhynie Free Church (CH3/935/4), 1842–1846
  • Rutherglen Stonelaw Kirk Session (CH3/1343/31), 1837–1855
  • Stewarton, Original Secession Church, joined Church of Scotland, 1839–43, Free Church from 1843 (CH3/789/7), 1843–1855
  • Stranraer Associate Session, Ivy Place Antiburgher, First United Secession, later United Presbyterian (CH3/549/11), 1811–1855
  • Stronsay, United Associate (Antiburgher), United Presbyterian, St John's United Free (CH3/1116/1, 4), 1799–1825, 1836–1855
  • Thurso Associate Congregation Church Kirk Session, Original Secession Church, joined the Free Church in 1852 (CH3/1399/1), 1841–1855
  • Urr Antiburgher, United Associate, Church, United Presbyterian, United Free (CH3/1038/1), 1817–1855
  • West Linton Associate Congregation, later United Presbyterian, West Linton and Newlands United Free and Trinity Church of Scotland (CH3/307/2–3), 1803–1852
  • Westruther Free Church, later United Free Church (CH3/469/39), 1729–1779
  • Wigtown United Associate Congregation, later United Presbyterian, West United Free Church and West Church of Scotland (CH3/310/4), 1849–1855
  • Yetholm Burgher (New Licht) Church, later United Presbyterian, Borderview United Free church, Saint James's Church of Scotland (CH3/578/1), 1838–1852

Deaths and burials
  • Bathgate Relief Session, later West United Presbyterian Church, St. John's United Free Church and St. John's Church of Scotland (CH3/416/13), 1832–1834
  • Bellshill Relief Church, United Presbyterian, West United Free, St. Andrew's Church of Scotland (CH3/1037/9, 12), 1797–1855
  • Campsie, Relief Church, United Presbyterian, United Free (CH3/1041/3), 1845–1855
  • Carluke, Kirkton, United Presbyterian Church (CH3/459/1), 1835–1837
  • Chirnside Reformed Presbyterian Congregation (CH3/336/1), 1843–1855
  • Dennyloanhead Associate (Antiburgher) Congregation, United Presbyterian, United Free, Church of Scotland (CH3/704/25), 1836–1851
  • Dunfermline, St Margaret's United Free Church (CH3/1232/33), 1825–1850
  • Edinburgh – Martyrs' Reformed Presbyterian Church Kirk Session, Free Church, United Free, united with St John's as Martyrs' and St John's, 1909 (CH3/1198/1), 1805–1855
  • Edzell Free Church, later United Free and Church of Scotland (CH3/543/4), 1837–1855
  • Glasgow – Regent Place United Associate (CH3/354/26), 1836–1840
  • Inch Free Church, later United Free, Castle Kennedy, united with Inch Church of Scotland in 1931 (CH3/557/1), 1845–1855
  • Insch Free Church, later United Free and East Church of Scotland (CH3/175/5), 1843–1855
  • Kirkcaldy, Pathhead Antiburgher Church, Associate Session (Linktoun), United Presbyterian (CH3/1144/8), 1839–1855
  • Kirkcowan, United Secession Church, United Presbyterian, United Free and Church of Scotland Danson Memorial (CH3/871/5), 1838–1855
  • Lethendy Associate Congregation (CH3/214/1), 1801
  • Lybster Free Church, United Free, Church of Scotland (CH3/882/1), 1844–1855
  • Monzie Free Church (CH3/567/2), 1843–1855
  • Morebattle, Free Church, United Free, and St Aidan's Church of Scotland (CH3/526/10), 1848–1853
  • Ordiquhill Free Church, United Free, Ordiquhill, Cornhill and Ordiquhill Church of Scotland (CH3/1045/53), 1845–1855
  • Paisley, Oakshaw East Associate Congregation (Antiburgher), later United Free Church (CH3/550/4), 1836–1855
  • Paisley, Reformed Presbyterian, Oakshaw Free Church, Oakshaw West United Free, and Church of Scotland (CH3/751/20), 1809–1821
  • Paisley, Abbey Close Associate Session, later United Presbyterian, United Free and Church of Scotland (CH3/465/39–40), 1842–1855
  • Rathillet Kirk Session (Burgher), later United Presbyterian, United Free and Church of Scotland (CH3/1565/4), 1783–1836
  • Stronsay, United Associate (Antiburgher), United Presbyterian, St John's United Free (CH3/1116/1), 1800–1810
  • West Linton Associate Congregation, later United Presbyterian, West Linton and Newlands United Free and Trinity Church of Scotland (CH3/307/2–3), 1812–1852

Note that these are additional records to a collection previously released. The complete list of available records for nonconformist Presbyterian denominations, and other denominations (including thre Roman catholic Church) are available at https://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk/guides/church-registers.

(With thanks to the NRS via https://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk/article/news-article-release-presbyterian-church-records)

Chris

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