Wednesday, 30 November 2016

Hampshire records added to TheGenealogist

From TheGenealogist (www.thegenealogist.co.uk):

Millions of New Parish Records added to the TheGenealogist


* Released in partnership with the Hampshire Genealogical Society there are over 2.1 million new fully searchable records of individuals released online for the first time

* With these records those searching for ancestors from Hampshire can discover almost 1.8 million people recorded within the baptisms from this area in the south of England as far back as 1538 up to 1751

* Family researchers can also discover the details of over 212,000 individuals from marriages between 1538 and 1753 and nearly 143,800 people listed in the burials of Hampshire from 1838 to 1865

Hampshire Genealogical Society worked with TheGenealogist to publish their records online, making 2,135,878 individuals from baptism, marriage and burial records fully searchable. Dolina Clarke, Chairman of Hampshire Genealogical Society said:

“The Hampshire Genealogical Society have decided to put the remaining data from their parish register indexes for Hampshire, which are not already on line, with FHS-Online and TheGenealogist (S & N). We looked at various different online sites and felt that S & N were able to offer us a very fair deal. Furthermore they are a British company with whom we have had a very good relationship for over 20 years.” Dolina Clarke, Chairman HGS www.hgs-familyhistory.com

Mark Bayley, Head of Online Development at TheGenealogist, welcomed Hampshire Genealogical Society to the growing number family history societies on both TheGenealogist and FHS-Online saying: “We’re delighted that HGS chose to publish their records through TheGenealogist and FHS-Online. This release adds to the ever expanding collection of parish records on both websites. These partnerships help societies boost their funds whilst bringing their records to a much wider audience, through online publication.”

This release joins TheGenealogist’s already published Hampshire parish records, sourced from the Phillimore Registers, and soon we will also be adding further transcriptions that will fill in any gaps to provide an even more comprehensive coverage of this important county.

If your society is interested in publishing records online, please contact Mark Bayley on 01722 717002 or see www.fhs-online.co.uk/about.php

(With thanks to Nick Thorne)

Chris


For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Tuesday, 29 November 2016

1831 census records from Hampshire online

I've received the following announcement from Kevin Smith, which may be of interest to those with Hampshire connections in England:

A free Christmas present for genealogists researching Fordingbridge, Hampshire

The 1831 census for Fordingbridge Town, Burgate & Midgham, and Godshill Tything have been transcribed and are freely available at www.kevinRsmith.co.uk (scroll to the bottom of the page to find the links).

The 1831 census was taken on 30 May 1831 but, unlike later censuses, lists only the head of each household, along with the number of people in the household and the number in each type of occupation. These records are rare surviving examples of this census.

These Hampshire records join others available from Kevin R. Smith covering Dorset and Aberdeenshire.

(With thanks to Kevin Smith)

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Forces War Records offer

From Forces War Records (https://www.forces-war-records.co.uk/):

Your pre-Christmas gift from Forces War Records - Original 1914 Princess Mary’s box with gift cards inside.


The Princess Mary Christmas gift box was given to all members of the armed forces on Christmas day 1914. These small boxes, made from silver for Officers and brass for all others, typically contained an ounce of tobacco, a packet of cigarettes, a lighter, a Christmas card and photograph from Princess Mary, some also contained sweets. Amazingly, it took until 1920 to deliver all 2.5 million!

So here’s our pre-Christmas gift to you – an original tin containing a selection of gift cards from Forces War Records:

1. 12 months free membership
2. Discount when you hire a professional researcher
3. Free Family Historian Software

Become a full member between 4th Dec and 11.59pm 11th December, 2016 and this could be yours. (winner selected at random) Why not give the gift cards as Christmas presents.

JOIN HERE: https://www.forces-war-records.co.uk/records.asp

(With thanks to Neil White)

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

New South Wales records added to Ancestry

Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk) has added a tonne of material online concerning New South Wales in Australia:

New South Wales, Australia, Miscellaneous Records, 1787-1976
http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=8822

The source for the materials included is The State Records Authority of New South Wales, Kingswood, New South Wales.

The detail on what has been included is something else! For a comprehensive overview of the additions please view http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/dbextra.aspx?dbid=8822. Let's just say it should be enough to keep some folk busy for a bit!

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Ten years of FamilySearch Indexing

This is definitely worthy of a wee announcement! From FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org):

Salt Lake City, Utah (28 November 2016), You go online to FamilySearch. You type an ancestor’s name. You instantly find your ancestor in any number of 5.5 billion historical records in the free online database. You are elated at how easy it was as you fill in another missing piece of your family tree puzzle. That successful experience was brought to you by a phenomenon called indexing. And most likely, you were the recipient of a free gift empowered by the efforts of many online indexing volunteers.

Next week (December 5th) is International Volunteer Day, and FamilySearch International is celebrating the 10th anniversary of its web-based, volunteer-driven, indexing initiative, which started in 2006. The migration from the previous CD-ROM-based format to the web has been nothing short of amazing, and the rest has been record-making history—literally. The indexing initiative is the largest undertaking of its kind and is unparalleled in its achievements.

As a thank you to indexers and the millions of people who have found family documents from their efforts, FamilySearch is sharing a collection of free downloadable “I HEART Families” images for use on social media, or as cell phone and computer wallpaper.

FamilySearch and its predecessors have been gathering and preserving the world’s historic records to assist people like me and you in making family history discoveries. It publishes millions of digital images of historic records from around the world on FamilySearch.org weekly. FamilySearch’s proprietary software, a lot of computing power, and the contributions of hundreds of thousands of volunteers and countless millions of donated hours make the genealogically rich names and information hidden on those historic records easily and freely searchable to millions of curiosity seekers online.

In 2006, the call went out for volunteers to help in this unprecedented, global cause, and the online community responded. In fact, in just 10 years, over 1.2 million volunteers worldwide have joined the cause and continue to donate much needed time and talent to help index the world’s historic genealogical records.

In the past 10 years, online volunteers have personally pored over 1.5 billion images of historic records from all over the world and made over 5 billion ancestral names conveniently searchable to me and you from any web-enabled device.

Who are these unsung heroes? “They are your next door neighbors and work colleagues who continue to respond to the call to make the world’s historic records freely searchable online for anyone interested in discovering the branches of their family trees,” said Collin Smith, a marketing manager for FamilySearch Indexing. “They hail from all over the world—200 countries to be exact and collectively, the volunteers speak and read 58 languages.”

Why do they do it? Their motivations vary according to Smith. Some are paying it forward because they personally have benefited from priceless searchable record collections online. Others like participating in something meaningful and historic that will make a big difference somehow. Ornella Lepore, a native of Naples, Italy, now living in the United States, helps index Italy’s records online—particularly those pertaining to her ancestral roots. “I can’t afford to travel to Italy as often or whenever I want to do my family history research,” said Lepore. “Having the historic records indexed online where my ancestors are from will help me in my research in the long run.” Not every historic collection from Italy she helps with will hold keys to her personal research, but she knows in time, some of them will. And that’s motivation enough for her.

The entire suite of US Censuses from 1790 to 1940 is most notable of the volunteers’ efforts. All of those records are now freely searchable online at FamilySearch.org. In 2010, the power of this online community was unleashed on the newly released 1940 US Census. They indexed the entire census—all 3.8 million pages of it—in just 4 months, giving access to 134 million names.

And so these volunteers continue to show up daily online, unsung and untold in the internet clouds, ages 12–95, picking historic projects of interest and making a difference for the next person online hoping to find an ancestor in the growing sea of historic records.

Learn more about volunteering online at FamilySearch Indexing (https://familysearch.org/indexing/).

COMMENT: Well done to all concerned - each index transcriptions makes the research process for
others just a little bit easier.

(Original press release sent via email)

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Sunday, 27 November 2016

Forthcoming events at London Metropolitan Archives

Some forthcoming events at London Metropolitan Archives (https://www.cityoflondon.gov.uk/things-to-do/london-metropolitan-archives/Pages/default.aspx):

City in the Blitz - walking tour
Thursday 29 December , 11 am - 1 pm.
On 29 December 1940 the City of London was subjected to one of the most intense bombing raids of the Second World War. This walk retraces the sequence and focal points of the raids, and the personal stories and heroism of the people involved.
Meet outside St Paul’s Tube Station (by exit marked to Cathedral).
Led by Chris Everett, CityHighLights.
£10 - booking essential.
Book your place at https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/city-in-the-blitz-tickets-26943199836


Queer Time; Queer Place; Queer Action: Sexualities and LocalitiesConference
Saturday 3 December, 9 am - 5 pm
The 14th LGBTQ History and Archives Conference will be created with the involvement of the Raphael Samuel History Centre and the Sexualities and Localities project (a collaboration between Birkbeck College and Leeds Beckett University).
£15 / £10 concs. (includes lunch)
Find out more and book your place https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/queer-time-queer-place-queer-action-sexualities-and-localities-tickets-26943527817


London’s Baking! Bakers, Cakes, Bread and Puddings from 1666
Exhibition runs until 1 February 2017
Taking its inspiration from Thomas Farriner and his bakery, the starting place of the Great Fire, this exhibition tells the story of London’s bakers from 1666 to the 20th century. Discover recipes (to take away and bake!) for almond cakes c1700, suet puddings c1850 and questionable school puddings from the 1970s.
Free - during normal LMA opening hours.
Find out more at https://www.cityoflondon.gov.uk/things-to-do/london-metropolitan-archives/news-events/Pages/londons-baking.aspx


Make the most of your trip to LMA
Every month, we run a selection of training sessions for LMA users to enhance your research. Whether you're new to archives or a seasoned visitor, you may still find these sessions useful!
We run sessions most months on the following topics:
  • Getting started at LMA
  • Handling documents
  • Family History starter sessions
  • Understanding old handwriting
Find out which events are coming up at https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/d/united-kingdom--london/new-visitors-to-lma/


Workshops and classes

Writing and Presenting Your Family History
Thursday 1 December, 2 - 4.30 pm
This workshop offers ideas and approaches to writing your family history using different styles and media, from creative scrapbooks to a basic website. Feel free to bring in work in progress. Think about how you want to present your work. Will it be a book, an illustrated magazine, a strip cartoon or an album?
£10 - booking essential
Book your place at https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/writing-and-presenting-your-family-history-tickets-26943219896

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Friday, 25 November 2016

AncestryDNA sale this weekend

Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk) has announced a limited sale this weekend on its DNA kits in the UK:

Lowest ever price for AncestryDNA

This Black Friday, you’ll be surprised at what you can discover with AncestryDNA. You’ll be even more surprised at the price – just £49. Make new family connections and reveal more of your unique story for less than ever before.

Now £49* Was £79
SAVE £30


*Offer expires on 28 November 2016 at 23:59 GMT. Offer does not include shipping costs. AncestryDNA is offered in the United Kingdom by Ancestry International DNA LLC.

To buy the kit visit https://order.ancestry.co.uk/ng/signup/?offer_id=O-24975&rtype=85&o_xid=74411&o_lid=74411&o_sch=Email+Campaigns#/register/ (you might need to register for a basic account first)



COMMENT: Note that postage and packing is not included - I believe this may be an additional £15 per kit, but happy to be corrected.

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Wednesday, 23 November 2016

Who Do You Think You Are? returns to BBC1

A new ten part series of the BBC's Who Do You Think You Are? series starts on Thursday evening at 8pm, BBC1.

From the BBC, a synopsis of the first episode:

EastEnders actor Danny Dyer hopes that he will 'freak a few people out' with his family history. Danny sets out to discover the history of his tough working-class family in the East End of London, but in the process he unearths an extraordinary lineage stretching back to the Norman conquest.



Who Do You Think You Are magazine has a feature on the actor's story at http://www.whodoyouthinkyouaremagazine.com/five-things-you-might-not-know-about-danny-dyer

The following trailer is also available for the whole series:



(Also available at https://youtu.be/x2z7Ae0GiVw)

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Tuesday, 22 November 2016

Family Tree Maker news update

A news update from Software MacKiev on genealogy software package Family Tree Maker:

WHAT'S HAPPENING TO FTM AT THE END OF THE YEAR?

As it gets closer to the end of 2016, we're understandably hearing this question a lot. In large part that's because it was initially announced that FTM would only be supported through the end of December 2016. But that was a million years ago back in December 2015 when it was also announced that brand wouldn't continue at all. All that changed 7 weeks later on February 2nd of this year — the day Ancestry announced that they'd decided after all to sell this wonderful old brand to us. And that together we would be building on what Ancestry had started, including creating a new sync technology together.

So relax. TreeSync® will not stop working at the stroke of midnight this December 31st. And though it will be retired at some point in the not too distant future, before that happens, there will be new syncing technology available to replace it. It's already well into development and we will be starting outside beta testing before the end of the year. And that means syncing as we know it for FTM is going to live on into 2017 and beyond. So if you've been worried about what happens at the end of the year, well you can just stop worrying. Syncing, Search, and Shaky Leaf hints are all here to stay.

WHEN THE BEST CHARTS IN THE WORLD ARE NOT ENOUGH

Family Tree Maker users know that FTM already has the most extensive collection of charts of any leading family history software. But if even that leaves you wanting more, a new plug-in, Charting Companion, provides six unique chart types not found in FTM, including the Descendant Fan (a combination of descendant and family tree fan charts), plus a great collection of embellishments and lots of special print options.

Charting Companion is only the second “plug-in” ever written for Family Tree Maker (the other being Stefan Harms' excellent Family Book Creator). That means you can access Charting Companion from Family Tree Maker menus and it will work directly with your tree files as though it were part of the program. And for a limited time you can get Charting Companion from our new FTM Gift Collection for just £24.95 (regularly £28) by visiting http://www.mackiev.com/store/ftm/offers/gifts/intern.html?edition=uk. Enjoy!

WHAT ABOUT THOSE FREE UPDATES?

When we happily adopted FTM earlier this year, we set out to create free updates that we could wholeheartedly recommend to all current users of FTM 2014 and Mac 3. That work is still in progress, but if you'd like to get your hands on a copy and you're OK with a near-final build, then you can have one any time. Even right now. Just head on over to our Replacement Center (see Getting a Replacement Copy, below).

So, should you get the latest build right now then? Well, it depends. The improvements are mostly in stability and performance. So if FTM is crashing or has slowed to a crawl with large trees, then have at it. Same if waiting is driving you crazy, or you usually download interim updates anyway. But if, like most users, your copy is working just fine, we still suggest waiting for the final build. To be notified as soon as the updates are ready, make sure to sign up for the mailing list at www.familytreemaker.com. For more info on the updates see “Free Updates Coming Soon” below.

JUST THE BEGINNING

We are having the time of our lives in our new role as publisher of this most beloved of family history brands, and we couldn't be more excited about what's coming next. To make sure you are the first on your block to get the latest Family Tree Maker news, sign up for the FTM Mailing List at www.familytreemaker.com. And stay tuned. This is just the beginning.


Jack Minsky
President
Software MacKiev

(With thanks to Software MacKiev via email)

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Thanks to Aberdeen and North-East Scotland Family History Society

A huge thanks to Aberdeen and North-East Scotland Family History Society's Glasgow branch for its hospitality on Saturday, when I gave my talk Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis.

The book on the talk is available at My History in Yorkshire, at http://www.my-history.co.uk/acatalog/Down-and-Out-in-Scotland-Researching-Ancestral-Crisis-UTP0286.html#SID=876 or as a PDF based ebook from Genealogy eBooks at http://www.gen-ebooks.com/down-and-out-in-scotland-ancestral-crisis.html.

A quick message from Buzzy Garden of the society:

"Aberdeen & North-East Scotland Family History Society is on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/anesfhs/ - worth following. For newbies, you are welcome to attend other ANESFHS meetings for exiles in the Central Belt - e.g. Edinburgh Group has the excellent Marjorie Harper on emigrants in Jan, Glasgow Group welcomes back Ken Nisbet on RCEs in Feb, etc. Details (& so much more) available on the recently revamped ANESFHS website at https://www.anesfhs.org.uk/meetings-events/events"

It was good also to catch up with colleagues from the Scottish Genealogy Network at the event - more on the network at www.scottishgenealogynetwork.co.uk.

(With thanks to Buzzy Garden and Michelle Leonard)

Chris





For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

US Presbyterian records join Ancestry

Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk) has a useful collection for those of us who have had Scottish and Ulster-Scot ancestors and relatives who emigrated to the United States:

The U.S. Presbyterian Records, 1743-1970 collection
http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=61048
Source: Church Registers. Presbyterian Historical Society, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

And here's the blurb from Ancestry:

Presbyterianism traces its roots primarily to England and Scotland during the Protestant Reformation of the 16th century. John Knox, a Scotsman who studied in Geneva with the French theologian John Calvin, is credited with having brought Calvinist teachings back to Scotland. He, along with protestants among the Scottish nobility, led the Protestant Reformation in Scotland. While churches of other protestant denominations are typically governed by either an episcopal system (by bishops) or through congregationalism, Presbyterians are governed via representative assemblies called presbyteries.

Early immigrants to America included Presbyterians, who founded congregations in the New World as early as the 1630s. They were an integral part of early American history, and participated in endeavors such as the writing of state and national constitutions. Their belief system was one of the driving forces behind the creation of a new government that included separation of powers as well as checks and balances on those powers.

Topics such as theology, governance, and slavery were all sources of disagreements within the Presbyterian church, and led to the formation of separate Presbyterian denominations during the early history of the United States. In the 20th century, topics such as women's issues, civil rights, and social justice issues have all had an impact on Presbyterian churches as well. Various denominations within the United States have split, reunited, and reorganized on multiple occasions due to internal debates on these and other issues. Today, the largest of the existing denominations is the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), which formed in 1983 as a result of the reunion of the Presbyterian Church in the U.S. the United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A.


As well as baptisms, marriages and burials, the records apparently also contain additional entries such as testificates (certificates or transfer to or from another church) and membership lists. I've not used the US Presbyterian records before, so would be interested to note if any of the entries point to places of origin in Ireland or Scotland for Presbyterian migrants to the States.

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Monday, 21 November 2016

Registry of Deeds Project index updated

The Registry of Deeds Index Project in Ireland has had another update, with the site now displaying 219,838 index entries from 24,978 memorials of deeds.


Established in 1708, the Registry of Deeds holds details of deeds conveying ownership or interests in properties, from transactions such as sales, mortgages, leases, marriage settlements and wills, and was first established as a means to record property held largely by Protestant landowners. The system was not compulsory, and so many transactions were never recorded, whilst for its earliest years it tended to largely record transactions for properties held by adherents to the Church of Ireland. It was not until the late 18th century and early 19th century that Presbyterians and Roman Catholics became better represented within its pages, following the relaxation of the Penal Laws.

The registration system was fairly straightforward. Copies of deeds known as memorials were created after the originals had been signed by both parties. Once verified by a Justice of the Peace and signed by a witness, they were then recorded into the register in Dublin and the original memorials then filed away.

To search the indexes, please visit http://irishdeedsindex.net/search/index.php.

(With thanks to the Registry of Deeds Index Project Ireland Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/RegistryofDeedsIndexProjectIreland)

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Saturday, 19 November 2016

Needing some Christmas stocking fillers?!

If you are needing some stocking fillers for your genealogically obsessed other half, offspring, parents or obsessive friends, why not purchase one of my genealogy books to keep them happy/distracted on Christmas Day?!  Here is the rabge....

Unlock the Past titles

I am the author of several titles published by Australian based firm Unlock the Past. These are as follows:
  • A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy
  • A Decade of Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-23
  • British and Irish Newspapers
  • Discover Irish Land Records
  • Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition)
  • Discover Scottish Land Records  
  • Discover Scottish Civil Registration Records 
  • Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis
  • Irish Family History Resources Online (2nd edition) 

  


They can be accessed from the following retailers:

The books are also all available in ebook format (PDF):

   


The following titles, listed by publisher, are also available worldwide from many retailers:

Pen and Sword titles
Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2013), £12.99
www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Irish-Family-History-on-the-Internet-Paperback/p/3889

Tracing Your Family History on the Internet, 2nd edition (2014), £12.99 [NB: UK genealogy]
www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Family-History-on-the-Internet-Paperback/p/6050
(E-editions also available for Kindle and ePub)


Family History Partnership
Researching Scottish Family History (2010), £7.95
www.thefamilyhistorypartnership.com/publications/publication-details.php?frmPublicationID=19


History Press
The Mount Stewart Murder: A Re-Examination of the UK's Oldest Unsolved Murder Case (2012), £14.99
http://www.thehistorypress.co.uk/publication/The-Mount-Stewart-Murder/9780752460208/
(E-editions also available for Kindle and ePub)
(The true account of the murder of my three times great grandmother in Perthshire in 1866, the UK's longest unsolved murder case by a modern police force)


  

Remember - if you purchase one or more of these books on Christmas Day, the intended recipient may be tempted enough to let you have the television for the whole day, or for much of Christmas week.

And if you're the recipient, don't worry - the telly's usually rubbish these days anyway...! :)

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Friday, 18 November 2016

Forthcoming National Records of Scotland talks

Forthcoming talks to be held at the National Records of Scotland (www.nrscotland.gov.uk):

22 November 2016, 10:00 - 12:00
Treasures from the National Records
Alison Lindsay (Head of Historical Search Room, NRS) talks about the records that NRS offers for researchers: maps, court records, kirk session minutes and other sources reveal the history of the ancient villages that now form part of the western suburbs of Edinburgh. (General Register House) This talk forms part of the Pentlands Book Festival, and places can only be booked via Eventbrite.

25 November 2016, 2.00 – 3.00pm
The Duke of Buccleuch and Queensberry’s Scottish archives
Crispin Powell (Archivist to Duke of Buccleuch and Queensberry). Crispin will talk about the rich archives still held at Drumlanrig Castle and Bowhill House, in addition to the pleasures and challenges of his role as the first professional archivist to look after the Duke’s collections in Scotland and England. Cataloguing, conservation and access are key elements of Crispin’s work, and he will outline the progress that has been made so far, and what plans he and the Duke have for the future. (New Register House)

9 December 2016, 2.00 – 3.00pm
Caring for your family papers
Linda Ramsay, Head of Conservation in NRS, and her colleagues will provide advice on storing, packaging, handling and preserving your family papers, from letters and plans, to photographs and ledgers, including tips on what to do about damp, mould and insects. Come ready with your document dilemmas! (New Register House)

(Originally published at http://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/research/visit-us/events-talks-and-visits)

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Thursday, 17 November 2016

Down and Out in Scotland - talk in Glasgow

I'll be giving a talk to the Glasgow branch of Aberdeen and North-East Scotland Family History Society this Saturday:


Details are also available at https://anesfhs.org.uk/meetings-events/glasgow-meetings/event/87-glw2016nov

I'll hopefully see a few of you there!

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Women's and Civilians' records coming to Forces War Records

From Forces War Records (www.forces-war-records.co.uk):

It’s not all about the men – during wartime many women played a huge part, on land and sea. Some served, whilst others carried out a range of duties to help their country. They were munition workers, air raid wardens, nurses, social workers, farm workers, politicians, drivers and other home front uniformed services.



From November 27th these collections will be on the website:

Civilian Gallantry Awards WW2 (NEW) is a complete range of Honours and Awards given to those 'behind the scenes'. From the Orders of Chivalry to mentions in dispatches, these records are a complete list of all awards made to civilians across Britain and the Empire, over half are women’s records.

Women drivers of the Great War (NEW and exclusive, and free to view until 1st December). This collection contains names of women who volunteered to work as Drivers, Driver Mechanics or Motor Washers for the British Army of WWI under the Women's Auxiliary Army Corps (WAAC). Some worked for home service, some worked overseas.

Territorial Force Nursing Service (TFNS) another exclusive collection to Forces War Records, lists civilian nurses who volunteered to work in military hospitals during WW1, and who received a Medal Roll.

Women in Allied service 1914-19 (NEW and exclusive) this extremely rare list comes from an original book ‘Femina Patriae Defensor’ and contains every woman from every allied nation who served and died in allied war during WW1. Covering many different services, from navy to land army to those who worked in the war factories.

(With thanks to Jennifer Holmes)

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

US Life Saving medals 1876-1944 on Ancestry

I like collections that you don't automatically think about with family history, so this one caught my eye on Ancestry:

U.S., Life Saving Medals Awarded, 1876-1944
http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=61331
Source: Record of Life Saving Medals Awarded, 1876-1944. NARA microform publication M2136. 1 Roll. NAI: 2217630. Records of the U.S. Coast Guard, 1785-2005, Record Group 26. The National Archives at Washington, D.C.

Here's the blurb:

This collection consists of registers that were used to record the awarding of Life-Saving Medals. These medals were first authorized by an act of Congress on June 20, 1874 (18 Stat. 127) which established that first and second class lifesaving medals could be bestowed "upon any persons who shall hereafter endanger their own lives in saving, or endeavoring to save lives from perils of the sea, within the United States, or upon any American vessel." The medal of the first class (gold) was confined to cases of "extreme and heroic daring," and the medal of the second class (silver) was to be awarded "in cases not sufficiently distinguished to deserve the medal of the first class." Entries were added to the registers in rough chronological order by date of award. Each entry in the registers recorded the following details for the award recipient, who was referred to as the applicant.

Name of applicant
Place of residence
Award inscription
Nature of service performed
Date of service
Date of application
Date of referral to commission
Date of commission report
Date of award
Nature of award (first or second-class OR gold or silver)
Date medal ordered (or other details)
Date medal sent (or other details)

There are further details about the collection on the US national archive site at https://research.archives.gov/id/2217630.

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Who Do You Think You Are Live 2017 tickets on sale

Tickets for Who Do You Think You Are Live 2017, to be held in Birmingham NEC again from April 6th-8th, are now on sale.

Courtesy of one of the sponsors, Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk), if you get in quick there is an early bird rate currently available until Tuesday 22nd November 2016, allowing you to obtain 2 tickets for the price of £20 if you use the code ANC20 when purchasing. To buy tickets visit www.whodoyouthinkyouarelive.com.

As with last year I may only be able to get down to the show for one day, as I currently have another possible commitment the same weekend, but will do my best to make it there!

(With thanks to Ancestry)

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Looking on the bright side of life

Apologies for the lack of posts over the last week. I've been fairly tied down with a few commitments, genealogical and otherwise, but also quite despondent after Trump's election (we have our very own special 'relationship' with him here in Scotland, involving unwanted golf courses). 2016 is definitely turning out to be one of those years - last night getting a punctured tyre in the middle of a hailstorm on the way back from carrying out some client research in Kilmarnock being just yet another symptom!

Anyway - before moving on, here's a wee ditty to help set anyone needing it back on track...!



(Also available at https://youtu.be/X_-q9xeOgG4)

Genealogy posting will now be resumed... :)

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Thursday, 10 November 2016

Free access to FindmyPast military records

FindmyPast (www.findmypast.com) has made its military records collections available for free from today until midnight on Sunday to help commemorate those who are being remembered.

To access the collections visit http://search.findmypast.co.uk/search-united-kingdom-records-in-military-armed-forces-and-conflict.

Several military records related posts and webinars are also available on the site's blog at https://blog.findmypast.co.uk/.


Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Wednesday, 9 November 2016

British Newspaper Archive redesigns available content information

The British Newspaper Archive (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk) has changed the way that you can access information on content that is available on the site, and which has been recently added.

In the past a simple panel on the home page allowed you to look for additions to the site in the last 30 days. The site now allows you to access which titles have been added in the last 7 days or the last 30 days, and also tells you what is scheduled to appear online the next day.


Whilst the availability of such information is welcome, the titles are not displayed in alphabetical order, however, meaning that you have to scroll down the lists to look for what you require, which is a tad tedious. I suspect the lists are in order of titles as and when they have been updated.Clicking on the alphabetical index does present a list of titles, and helpfully, those which have been updated tell you so with a tag, including how recently it was updated.


Similarly you can click for a complete list of all titles, which displays similar information - however, unlike the previous version, it takes a lot of scrolling to locate what you are interested in, as the type size and spacing is much larger, so you may be better using the alphabetical index.

Clicking on each title also now presents a detailed summary of information about the newspaper, including a link to a page from the title one hundred years ago (I assume where available!).



Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

New Statistical Accounts of Scotland website launched

A press release from the University of Edinburgh's EDINA service:

We are delighted to announce the launch of the refreshed Statistical Accounts of Scotland online service at http://stataccscot.edina.ac.uk.

As well as a new intuitive and streamlined interface, the redeveloped service features improved search, transcripts and metadata, making it easier to find relevant information within the accounts.

The new service offers:

* Interactive historical maps
* Contextual narratives that give more information on the accounts and their history
* Parish and county pages listing all related sections within the volumes
* High resolution images

Our not-for-profit subscription service has been enhanced with additional features designed to make it easy to work with the historical texts:

* View your personal search history
* Tag pages, sections and images with keywords
* Annotate pages, sections and images with longer notes
* Browse and filter personal tags and annotations

Over the next few weeks we will publish a series of blog posts giving more details on the new features: you can follow these at http://statacc.blogs.edina.ac.uk/







COMMENT: The Statistical Accounts of Scotland site is the first platform you should bookmark after ScotlandsPeople (www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk) if doing Scottish based ancestral research. The site contains two detailed descriptions from the 1790s and 1830s/1840s of every Church of Scotland parish, as recorded by the minister, providing essential background context onto which you can paint your ancestral stories.

From an initial exploration, the new site will take some time to get used to. On the one hand, I very much like the searchable interactive map, but I do find the pages take a lot more effort to scroll down through with such large pictures and such little boxes of text. 

Note that the original version of the website is still accesible at http://stat-acc-scot.edina.ac.uk/sas/sas.asp?action=public, though this will be phased out next year.



(With thanks to Nicola Osborne and Lisa Otty)

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Self-service photography at PRONI and new fees

Northern Ireland's Department of Communities has approved a statutory instrument concerning changes to rules and fees for PRONI services. The Statutory Instrument - Public Use of the Records (Management and Fees) Rules (Northern Ireland) 2016 - will be passed this week and come into operation from December 15th 2016. The instrument revokes the previous order from 2009.

The net result will be that PRONI will continue to offer free access to records on site and online, and that self-service photography will be allowed in the search rooms with mobile phones, digital cameras and tablet devices, subject to the signing of a copying and copyright notice as part of the document ordering process (essentially putting the onus on observing copyright of the materials viewed on the user). A new Code of Conduct is also to be introduced.

A Revised Table of Fees is also being introduced for optional products and services, on top of the free access to records, as follows - prices are exclusive of VAT (click on pic to enlarge):




For further details please contact PRONI (www.nidirect.gov.uk/proni).

(With thanks to Dr. Glynn Kelso)

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Tuesday, 8 November 2016

MyHeritage launches new DNA service

From MyHeritage (www.myheritage.com):

Big news - we're thrilled to announce the launch of MyHeritage DNA, our new global integrated genetic testing service!

Our mass-market home-testing kit is simple, affordable and will help millions of people around the world uncover their ethnic origins and make new family connections.

The kit consists of a simple cheek swab and takes only a minute to complete, with no need for blood or saliva. The sample is then mailed to MyHeritage DNA’s lab for analysis and the user is invited to view the results on the MyHeritage website. In its initial version, MyHeritage DNA provides two main features: detailed ethnicity reports that

map the user’s ethnic and geographic origins, and DNA Matches for finding relatives. Additional features and capabilities are planned for the future.

The initial reports currently include 25 ethnicities, but this will improve dramatically thanks to MyHeritage’s unique Founder Population project unveiled today — the largest of its kind ever conducted. More than 5000 participants have been handpicked for this project by MyHeritage from its 85 million members, by virtue of their family trees exemplifying consistent ancestry from the same region or ethnicity for many generations. In the next few months, the project will be completed, resulting in a rich DNA data set of more than 100 ethnicities that will enable MyHeritage to show users their ancestral roots with far greater resolution than other services. To this end, the company has been sending its DNA kits to project participants far and wide, from Uzbekistan to Fiji, from Greenland to South Africa, and every corner of the globe. Standard ethnicity reports are currently available, with the expert reports to be released at no additional cost to users following the completion of the Founder Population project.

MyHeritage DNA is seamlessly integrated with the other services provided by MyHeritage on all web and mobile platforms, as well as offered on a dedicated standalone mobile app released today named MyHeritage DNA.

MyHeritage DNA kits are available at an affordable introductory price of £79. MyHeritage has already amassed a significant number of DNA kits uploaded by its users from other DNA services, providing valuable matches on MyHeritage from day one. Users who have already tested their DNA on other services are welcome for a limited time to upload their DNA data to MyHeritage at no cost to benefit from free DNA Matches.

To learn more about MyHeritage DNA please visit https://www.myheritagedna.com.

(With thanks to Laurence Harris)

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

What TheGenealogist has in store for 2017

From TheGenealogist (www.thegenealogist.co.uk):

What TheGenealogist has in store for 2017


2017 is going to see millions of new records added to TheGenealogist across a wide variety of collections.

New Data Sets

We are adding millions of new and unique Parish Records and Bishops’ Transcripts are being added for many more counties.

A new and unique record set covering detailed records of our ancestors houses, which will be searchable by name, address and area, with high resolution maps showing the property.

Our ongoing project with The National Archives is set to release yet more detailed Colour County and Tithe Maps with tags to show where your ancestors lived.

We are releasing a 1921 census substitute, using a wide variety of records including Trade and Residential Directories of the time.

New decades of BT27 Passenger Lists and Emigration Records will become available.

Our International Headstone Project will be expanded with more Commonwealth Cemeteries added.

More worldwide War Memorials added to our comprehensive database.

Following on from our release of over 230 million U.S. records in 2016, we will be launching more U.S. records in 2017.

New & Improved Census Images

Thanks to new technology and new Silver Halide Film provided by The National Archives, we have now been able to re-scan the 1891 census with improved resolution and quality. This combination of improved readability and new transcripts will help locate your ancestors and view the relevant images with a superior grayscale format. Our “Deep Zoom” images have over 5 times the resolution of previous images. They will be lightening fast to view thanks to the technology used in our new image interface. We will launch these new images in early 2017.

Look out for these exciting new developments and more in 2017 at TheGenealogist.co.uk

(With thanks to Nick Thorne)

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Friday, 4 November 2016

Guide to the UK's Gazette newspapers

Not sure if this has just been published, or if The Gazette is just tweeting about it, but Else Churchill from the Society of Genenalogists has written a useful background guide to the The Gazette newspaper's three incarnations in London, Belfast and Edinburgh at https://www.thegazette.co.uk/all-notices/content/100857.


Incidentally, for Irish research I discovered last year that fully searchable copies of the Dublin Gazette (now called Iris Oifigiuil) from 1750-1800 are freely available on the Oireachtas Library website. For further details visit my blog post at http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/2015/08/the-dublin-gazette-from-1750-1800-is.html.


Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Diaspora collections and Irish military records on FindmyPast

Latest offerings from FindmyPast (www.findmypast.com):


Ireland, Royal Hibernian Military School History

Explore this 168 page document to uncover the history of the Royal Hibernian Military School in Dublin. This fascinating publication includes transcriptions from memorial inscriptions, a roll of honour from the First World War, and transcripts from both the 1901 and 1911 census.

The Royal Hibernian Military School was founded in 1765 in Phoenix Park, Dublin. Today, it is the site of St Mary's Hospital. When the school closed in 1
924, all the registers and minute books were taken to Walworth, London. However, during the Second World War, these documents were destroyed in the Blitz. The Ireland, Royal Hibernian Military school history provides a valuable substitute for the records that were lost.


Ireland Military Records

Ireland Military Records is comprised of 8 different Irish military publications and contains over 2,700 records. The collection includes memorial inscriptions, army lists from the 19th and 17th centuries as well as two volumes of popular novels written by Charles Lever.

Each record is displayed as a PDF (Portable document format). The detail found in each record will vary depending on the publication and the subject.


United States marriages

Over 2.7 million additional records have been added to our collection of United States Marriages. The new additions come from 13 different states and include significant updates from Alabama, Florida, Illinois, Kentucky, Ohio and Rhode Island.

The records include transcripts and images of the original documents that list marriage date, the names of the bride and groom, birthplace, birth date, age and residence as well as fathers' and mothers' names.


1840 U.S. Census, Revolutionary War Veterans

Over 21,000 records of ex-servicemen and their next of kin who were receiving pensions in 1840 for service in the Revolutionary War.

On the back of the population schedules for the 1840 census, enumerators recorded the living pensioners of the Revolutionary War as well as other military service. The lists also noted an individual's age and the name of the head of household in which the individual lived.


New Zealand Wars, officers and men killed 1860-1870

This consists of 193 transcripts of nominal returns of colonial officers and men who were killed in action while fighting in the Maori Wars. The Māori Wars, began as a result of contested land purchases by the colonial government. The conflict between the colonial government and the Māori resistance reached its height in the 1860s, with the largest campaign, the Waikato invasion, occurring from 1863 to 64.


New Zealand, military pensions 1900-1902

Find out if your ancestor was eligible for a military pension and uncover details of their next of kin with a collection of over 5,000 transcripts recording former servicemen who were eligible for military pensions between 1900 and 1902.

Further details and collection links at https://blog.findmypast.com/findmypast-friday-2077866124.html

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

British Newspaper Archive hits 16 million pages

The British Newspaper Archive (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk) has reached 16 million pages of content.



The following are the most recent additions in the last 30 days:

Alloa Advertiser 1857 - 1871, 1892 - 1899, 1909
Athletic News 1910 - 1911, 1922 - 1930
Banbury Advertiser 1948 - 1956
Beverley Guardian 1877
Birmingham Chronicle 1819 - 1822, 1824 - 1827
Buxton Herald 1880, 1882 - 1887
Cornish & Devon Post 1878 - 1879, 1881 - 1892, 1894, 1896, 1900 - 1909
Derbyshire Advertiser and Journal 1906, 1908, 1911, 1913 - 1916, 1918 - 1919, 1921 - 1923, 1929
Dorset County Chronicle 1880
Dudley Mercury, Stourbridge, Brierley Hill, and County Express 1887
Faringdon Advertiser and Vale of the White Horse Gazette 1903, 1905 - 1922
Fifeshire Advertiser 1946, 1949 - 1950, 1952 - 1956
Hendon & Finchley Times 1923 - 1928, 1930 - 1934
Irish Times 1867, 1884 - 1885, 1887 - 1889, 1892 - 1893, 1895, 1898, 1902 - 1903
Lancaster Guardian 1855, 1857, 1862, 1866, 1877, 1942, 1951
Launceston Weekly News, and Cornwall & Devon Advertiser. 1856 - 1866
Leeds Mercury 1928 - 1934
Midland Examiner and Times 1874 - 1877
Monmouthshire Beacon 1909 - 1931, 1934 - 1944, 1946, 1951 - 1956
Newcastle Daily Chronicle 1858 - 1861, 1863 - 1867, 1869
Pontefract Advertiser 1858, 1891
Preston Herald 1877
Salisbury Times, The 1868 - 1869, 1874 - 1895, 1898 - 1909
Sheffield Weekly Telegraph 1884 - 1889, 1894 - 1897, 1899 - 1904, 1906 - 1907, 1909, 1918 - 1920
Sporting Times 1867 - 1868, 1873 - 1874, 1876, 1880 - 1883, 1890, 1895 - 1896, 1898 - 1899, 1902 - 1903, 1910 - 1915, 1924 - 1926
St. Andrews Citizen 1907 - 1913
Thanet Advertiser 1859 - 1861, 1863 - 1869, 1871 - 1903, 1914 - 1920, 1930 - 1931, 1944, 1949 - 1950
Totnes Weekly Times 1884 - 1895, 1898 - 1901
Tyrone Constitution 1877 - 1884, 1886 - 1889, 1891 - 1900, 1906 - 1909
Tyrone Courier 1888 - 1889, 1891 - 1892, 1894 - 1903, 1907 - 1908
Ulster Gazette 1875 - 1877, 1879 - 1884, 1886 - 1896
Warminster & Westbury journal, and Wilts County Advertiser 1925 - 1956
Warwick and Warwickshire Advertiser 1874
Waterford Standard 1863, 1866 - 1872, 1874 - 1880, 1882 - 1886, 1888 - 1896
Weekly Freeman's Journal 1917 - 1918, 1920 - 1924
Weekly Irish Times 1883 - 1884, 1886 - 1892, 1894 - 1896
Wellington Journal 1876 - 1896, 1899 - 1909
Wiltshire Times and Trowbridge Advertiser 1920 - 1947, 1949 - 1953

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

New English & Welsh GRO birth and death indexes

The General Register Office for England and Wales has launched a new searchable index system for births (1837-1915) and deaths (1837-1957).

After registering and signing in at https://www.gro.gov.uk/gro/content/certificates/Login.asp you will be taken to the following home screen:


By selecting the Search GRO indexes link, you will be offered the following choices between Births and Deaths:


Clicking on the Birth option takes you to a search screen that allows for searches on the following options:

Surname at birth *
First forename
Second forename
Gender *
Mother's maiden name
Years (up to 2 years +/-) *
Quarters
District of birth (a link to a PDF document of registration districts is available)
Volume number
Page number

(* must be selected)

Name options can be searched exactly, phonetically similar, or similar sounding.

Once you click on search, results will appear below, with an option to order the document:



For Death searches, the following fields are available

Surname at death *
First forename
Second forename
Gender *
Age at death (enter 0 for less than 1)
Years (up to 2 years +/-) *
Quarters
District of death (a link to a PDF document of registration districts is available)
Volume number
Page number

(* must be selected)

For marriages, and other birth and death events, including overseas events, you need to use the second option on the original home screen marked Place an Order, which will take you to a separate application page. As before, certificates cost £9.25 each.

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Beginner's Guide to British and Irish Genealogy, A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.