Tuesday, 31 May 2016

Genealogy in the Sunshine 2017

In his latest Lost Cousins (www.lostcousins.com) newsletter, Peter Calver has given an update on his next proposed Genealogy in the Sunshine conference at the Rocha Brava resort in the Portuguese Algarve. The event, first started in 2014 and 2015, has had a break this year, but is intended to hopefully return next March. Here's Peter's comments:

I can't give you a firm date at the moment, not least because I'm waiting for formal confirmation that Who Do You Think You Are? Live will take place between 6-8th April, as indicated on Facebook. However, I can tell you that we're currently looking at the last week of March for Genealogy in the Sunshine 2017, ie Saturday 25th March to Saturday 1st April - so you might want to pencil all these dates into your 2017 diary.

For more information please visit http://lostcousins.com/newsletters2/may16xtra.htm.


(For reports on the last event in 2015, see http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/2015/03/genealogy-in-sunshine-conference-day-1.html, http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/2015/03/genealogy-in-sunshine-day-2-report.html, and http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/2015/03/genealogy-in-sunshine-and-eclipse.html)

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

The Belfast Weekly News for Scottish research

A few years ago I blogged about how difficult it was to do any meaningful research into the activities of Orange Order based ancestors (see http://scottishancestry.blogspot.co.uk/2009/10/orange-order-records-in-scotland.html). Now don't get me wrong - I have no love for the Orange Order whatsoever - but as family historians we are constantly advised not to judge the actions of our ancestors in the past from a modern perspective. So whether I agree or not with what the Orange Order stands for today is irrelevant - I have ancestors who were members, and if I wish to understand who they truly were, it is an aspect of their lives that must also be researched.

To lay my cards on the table, I have a great grandfather who was said to have been a grand master of a lodge in Northern Ireland, and a great grandfather who was stated to have been a grand master of a Royal Black Institution lodge in Glasgow, its sister body. With the latter, my father has in the past talked about how his grandfather was apparently fetched every year in a horse and cart to lead the July 12th parades in Glasgow. I've never been able to prove the RBI connection until now, but a new resource online has proved to be of enormous help on this front.

Amongst the holdings of the British Newspaper Archive (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk) is a run of the Belfast Weekly News, which, when complete, looks likely to cover the period from 1857-1914 (at the time of writing the site has coverage from 1857-1880, 1882-1883, 1885-1890, 1897-1898, 1904-1914). This title was very much one that had an Orange perspective at the time of publication, but one of the things that I have discovered within it is that it carries regular reports from Scottish based Orange lodges, sent over to Belfast on a weekly basis - and in amongst these I have finally discovered which Orange lodges, and which Royal Black Institution lodge, in Bridgeton, Glasgow, that my great grandfather was a member of at various points - he is not only regularly reported as an office bearer at meetings, but also at various parades and funerals etc. In addition, I have also discovered mention of one of his brothers in a lodge in Glasgow, pushing back his own date of arrival in Scotland from Derry by at least a couple of years in the 1870s.

The reports, it has to be said, are usually incredibly dry, merely listing meetings, who attended, who gave addresses, who sang, who gave toasts, etc, and tend to name office bearers rather than rank and file members. But the period in question is also that of the three Home Rule bills, the Ulster Covenant and the lead up to the First World War, and as such, is a useful title to help gain the Orange and Unionist persective of events in Ireland from that time.

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Friday, 27 May 2016

DNA marker link to Battle of Bannockburn identified

A couple of years ago I blogged about the University of Strathclyde's Bannockburn Family History Project (see http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/2014/04/battle-of-bannockburn-family-history.html), which attempts to find DNA connections to folk living today with many of the participants at the medieval battle.

The latest annoucnement from the project was made today, concerning a connection established between a Stirlingshire based businessman and the line of King Robert III, thanks to a newly identified marker called ZZ52 specific to the lineage of his son, Sir John Stewart of Blackhall and Ardgowan. John grandfather was Walter Stewart, who particpated in the battle on the side of the Bruce.

The full story is available in the National newspaper at www.thenational.scot/news/grandfathers-royal-roots-revealed-by-advanced-dna-test.18074, with the BBC picking up on it also at www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-tayside-central-36396531.

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Battle of Jutland records on FindmyPast

FindmyPast (www.findmypast.com) has uploaded a collection of records for the Battle of Jutland. From the site:

This new collection has been specially created to bring together the names of those who participated in the battle of Jutland between 31 May and 1 June 1926. The collection is not comprehensive and there may be some gaps. It was created from the following series found at The National Archives in London.

ADM 159: Royal Marines, service records
ADM 188: Royal Navy Seamen, service records
ADM 196: Royal Navy officers, service records
ADM 240: Royal Naval Reserve officers, service records
ADM 377: Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, ratings’ service records

The FindyPast collection, entitled British Royal Navy & Royal Marines, Battle Of Jutland 1916 Servicemen (http://search.findmypast.com/search-world-Records/british-royal-navy-and-royal-marines-battle-of-jutland-1916-servicemen), also uses transcripts created by Naval and Military Press, though no source details are provided for these.

Also released is an update to its Ireland, Poverty Relief Loans 1821-1874 collection (http://search.findmypast.com/search-world-Records/ireland-poverty-relief-loans-1821-1874), which sees an additional 5000 records added, although again, there is no information as to the nature of which areas these new records might concern.

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Thursday, 26 May 2016

Australian history and genealogy expo 2016

From Unlock the Past (www.unlockthepast.com.au):

Announcing the Australian history & genealogy expo 2016 a major event for all history, genealogy & heritage enthusiasts

Adelaide, South Australia, 25 May 2016 - History and genealogy company, Unlock the Past, invites all history, heritage and genealogy enthusiasts to attend its 8th history & genealogy expo. It will be held in Adelaide over two days, Friday and Saturday 7–8 Oct 2016, at Immanuel College, Novar Gardens, SA.

The 2016 expo is the first ever national expo in Australia. It will appeal to anyone interested in family, local and social history and heritage in South Australia especially, but to all Australians.

It is a unique opportunity to see many societies, libraries and commercial product and service suppliers in one place and to learn from the presentations offered. The exhibition will feature about 70 exhibitors from several states covering a wide range of history, heritage and genealogy interests. Hear 30 expert presenters from five states and New Zealand. The expo is also an opportunity to mingle and network with other like-minded attendees and people who have been working in the industry for many years.

We are fortunate to have two eminent historians to head our extensive program of presentations.

Professor Philip Payton is a leading international authority on Cornish history, the Cornish in Australia, Cornish emigration and Australia and the First World War. Dr Tom Lewis, OAM, is an Australian author, military historian, editor, and former naval officer. A further 30 others, many recognised nationally and internationally, will add to the program which will feature

• 12 main theatre feature presentations
• 25 classroom presentations
• 50 short FREE mini-theatre product demos, tutorials, etc.

Other features include one-on-one consultations with experts, special offers from some exhibitors and over $2000 in prizes from expo exhibitors and sponsors.

Pre-booking will be encouraged with extra benefits, but expo entry and talk bookings (if not booked out) will be available on the day as well.

“We have organised seven previous expos and over 90 other events in all eight Australian states and territories and some overseas. This expo will be our largest event. With a large number and variety of exhibitors and a wide ranging program of presentations by some of the leading presenters in the history, genealogy and heritage fields in Australia and New Zealand, it should be something special for all Australians with history, genealogy and heritage interests” – Alan Phillips, Unlock the Past

“Attending family history expos is an excellent way to hear fantastic speakers in the one venue plus visit and talk with a range of vendors, purchase books and other genealogy resources as well as meet other family history enthusiasts or catch up with old friends. A two day event makes it just like a conference and worth any travel and accommodation if you don't live in Adelaide. Who can resist a one stop genealogy experience?"

– Shauna Hicks, historian, genealogist, speaker and author – and impetus for the launch of Unlock the Past in 2009

For more information, including speakers, exhibitors, program and online bookings visit the expo website:

http://www.unlockthepast.com.au/AustralianExpo2016

Join us at the 8th Unlock the Past Australian History & Genealogy Expo
– you won’t be disappointed –

About Professor Philip Payton - leading international authority on Cornish history, the Cornish in Australia, Cornish emigration and Australia during the First World War.

• Professor of History, Flinders University
• Adjunct Professor, National Centre for Australian Studies, Monash University
• Hon. Fellow (FAHA) Australian Academy of the Humanities
• Emeritus Professor of Cornish & Australian Studies, University of Exeter
• former Commander, Royal Navy (for 12 years)
• author of numerous books on
• the Cornish - internationally with some specific to Australia
• Australia in the Great War
• other historical topics
• frequent lecturer at conferences, cruises and other events

About Dr Tom Lewis, OAM - Darwin based military historian, author, editor, speaker
• consultant military historian
• former naval officer
• author of 13 books, many on northern Australian history in WWII
• led two military museums to new success
• Royal Australian Naval College Historical Collection in Jervis Bay
• Darwin Military Museum, where he was Director for five years
• in popular demand on radio and TV, appearing in several documentaries
• Military Historian on The Territory Remembers 2017, commemorating 75 years since the first attack on Darwin
• awarded the OAM in 2003 - and other service decorations

About Unlock the Past

Our parent company Gould Genealogy commenced 40 years ago. Unlock the Past started in 2009 and Is
• a specialist genealogy publisher, currently with
o over 70 guide books in both print and ebook editions – covering Australia, international andmiscellaneous topics
o 28 authors from Australia, New Zealand, the US, the UK and Scotland
o licenced international printers/distributors in the UK and north America

• a special/major events organiser - nearly 100 events since 2010, including o 8 expos in 4 states
o 13 history & genealogy cruises - from Australia, New Zealand and the UK
o Australia’s first ever national battlefield tour—to NT 2012
o numerous seminars & roadshows with leading national/international presenters

Contact: Alan Phillips, Unlock the Past, (08) 8263 2055 or 1300 526 069 (cost of a local call) email: alan@unlockthepast.com.au web: www.unlockthepast.com.au

(With thanks to Alan)

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Tuesday, 24 May 2016

My Irish talks at Strathclyde's Summer Institute of Genealogical Studies

A quick note to say that I will be contributing two lectures to the University of Strathclyde's Summer Institute of Genealogical Studies, as part of the 'Irish Resources and Research Techniques' strand of lectures being led by the Ulster Historical Foundation's William Roulston and Gillian Hunt.

The week long programme takes place in Glasgow from June 27th-July 1st 2016, with my talks being given on Friday 1st July. These are:

Sources for studying the ‘Decade of Centenaries’ (1912-1923) in Ireland
Looking for Irish ancestors in Scottish records

For a full itinerary of talks for the Irish strand, as well as those for the parallel strands, 'British Military Research' and 'Practical Applications of Genetic Genealogy', see the university's website at http://www.strath.ac.uk/cll/cpd/genealogicalstudies/summerinstitute/.

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Munster Express coverage extended on Irish Newspaper Archive

Coverage of the Munster Express has been extended on the Irish Newspaper Archive (www.irishnewsarchive.com) to cover the years from 1860-present day (previously it started at 1908). For more information please visit https://www.irishnewsarchive.com/wp/munster-express-archive-update, where you will also find a discount code to allow 15% off access to the title, and access to the first edition for free.

Note the following years have been added specifically - 1860-1907 / 1909-1910 / 1912 / 1914-1915 / 1917- 1919 / 1921 / 1925 / 1941 / 1943 / 1951 / 1957 / 1966 / 1970 / 1974-1979

This should keep me fairly busy for a bit - I've already found a tonne of information on my wife's family from this paper in the past, it's been an absolute gold mine!



(With thanks to Andrew Martin via email)

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Lancashire Archives cuts hours for public access

From Lancashire Archives (http://www.lancashire.gov.uk/libraries-and-archives/archives-and-record-office.aspx):

Please note that from Monday 4 July 2016 Lancashire Archives will be open as follows:

* Monday CLOSED
* Tuesday 9.30-5.00 – open until 7.00pm on the second Tuesday of each month
* Wednesday 9.30-5.00
* Thursday 9.30-5.00
* Friday 9.30-5.00
* Saturday 10.00-4.00 on the second Saturday of each month only

The reduction from 42.5 to 30 hours each week reflects a significant reduction to the archive service budget and the loss of several staff. These stem from the county council's need to make significant financial savings, both to offset the Government's cuts to its funding and to account for cost pressures brought about by high demand for services. Additionally, the fall in archive visits from 12887 in 2005 to 5504 in 2015 means that we have to do things differently. The phrase 'use it or lose it' starts to become real.

Mondays will be spent on essential tasks such as cleaning new accessions, answering enquiries, and digitisation. At the moment I intend to continue document production on demand and throughout lunchtime (except on Saturday) but this will be kept under close review and I can't rule out further reductions in opening hours or a document ordering system in the future.

Following the user consultation, which identified a surprising amount of support for an evening opening, I have decided to open on one Tuesday evening each month. This will be fully staffed and I hope that it will be well supported by archive users. Saturday opening will remain as at present, so that there is an opportunity for people who work Monday to Friday to use the service.

I am sorry to introduce these cuts and I sincerely hope that they will not cause major problems to archive users, but will instead encourage you to make the most of the time when the searchroom is open .

Jacquie Crosby
Archives Service Manager
Lancashire Archives
Lancashire County Council
01772 533028
www.lancashire.gov.uk

(With thanks to the Federation of Family History Societies Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/FederationFHS/posts/1117954911605693)

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Update on National Archives podcasts

Thanks to reader Jacqui Kirk (@genealgenie) who on the back of my recent post about the lack of TNA podcasts in recent months (see http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/2016/05/has-national-archives-stopping.html) contacted the archive's User Advisory Group to enquire as to the reason. The reply was that it is all down to recent staff changes, but with a promise to add more soon.

As if to make good on that promise, a new podcast has been uploaded, the first since January. It is a talk just under 45 minutes long by Heidi Thomas entitled Researching Call the Midwife, and available to listen to at http://media.nationalarchives.gov.uk/index.php/heidi-thomas-researching-call-midwife/ or via iTunes.

Incidentally, the National Archives is advertyising for a new Collections Knowledge Manager, to help with the management of its online systems - full job specs at https://www.civilservicejobs.service.gov.uk/csr/jobs.cgi?jcode=1491644, the deadline for applications is June 1st.

(Additional thanks to @DavidUnderdown9 for heads up on the new podcast upload)

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Saturday, 21 May 2016

FindmyPast adds Irish election registers and Westminster records

FindmyPast has added 26 volumes of British Library Electoral registers from Ireland, for the years 1885-1886, covering the counties of Armagh, Fermanagh, Down, Limerick, Mayo, Meath, Tyrone, Roscommon, Westmeath, Wexford and Wicklow.

The site has also added 300,000 baptisms, 409,000 marriages and 517,000 burial records for Westminster.

For further details visit https://blog.findmypast.co.uk/fridays

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

MyHeritage to add DNA database

From My Heritage (www.myheritage.com):

We're excited to let you know that we now offer the ability to upload DNA data to your family tree on MyHeritage, enabling you to discover more about your family history. Your DNA data will be kept private and secure.

Enhancing your family tree with DNA results can lead to new discoveries. Soon, MyHeritage will roll out DNA Matching, allowing you to be matched to other people who share DNA with you and are likely related to you. MyHeritage will allow you to review the family trees of your DNA Matches (excluding living people) and filter them by shared surnames or locations to focus on matches that are more relevant to you. Best of all, DNA Matching will be combined with the power of MyHeritage's other technologies — Smart Matching™ and Record Matching — helping you determine the likely relationship path to your DNA Matches and prove or disprove other matches. You will be able to connect with new relatives and collaborate with them.

Further down the road, MyHeritage will provide detailed ethnic and geographic origin reports based on DNA.

These features, including the DNA Matching, are currently FREE.

If you or your family members have already done a DNA test on AncestryDNA, 23andMe or FamilyTreeDNA Family Finder, you are invited to export this data, and upload it to MyHeritage in just a few clicks. Your DNA will be matched for free to a very large set of additional people. You'll benefit from MyHeritage's vast international user base of 82 million registered users, plus the 10 million additional registered users on Geni, and get matches you would not receive otherwise. If you upload your DNA data now, you will enjoy DNA Matching for free. This may become a paid feature
later on, but it will remain free for users who upload now.

(With thanks to MyHeritage)

UPDATE: Before using this new feature it is highly recommended that you read the following blog post from the Legal Genealogist, Judy G. Russell, concerning the new facility's terms and conditions and which consent you are required to give to use it - see http://www.legalgenealogist.com/blog/2016/05/22/myheritage-dna-matching-terms-of-use/.


Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Norfolk archive commemorates WW2 US pilots

A new online digital archive, the Second Air Division Digital Archive, has been launched in Norwich telling the story of US pilots stationed in Norfolk during the Second World War. The collection includes more than 30,000 photographs and other documents from the United States Army Air Force Second Air Division.

For more on the story visit http://www.edp24.co.uk/news/newly_launched_online_archive_sheds_light_on_us_heroes_based_in_norfolk_1_4541646 - the archive itself is accessible at http://www.2ndair.org.uk/digitalarchive.

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Thursday, 19 May 2016

RootsIreland offers new 24 hour subscription

RootsIreland (www.rootsireland.ie) has created a realistic subscription option for folk wishing to gain access to its site for a 24 hour period, as opposed to a month:

New 1 day (24 hours) Subscription now available

A 1 day subscription is a subscription that runs over a continuous 24 hour period. Prices are $11.00 or €10.00 or £8.00.

You can upgrade your 1 day (24 hours) subscription to any of our other subscription options when the one day subscription ends. If you decide to upgrade to a 1, 6 or 12 month subscription within 30 days of purchase, the price you paid for your 1 day subscription will be deducted from the cost of your new subscription.

To avail of the upgrade offer you must purchase a new 1, 6 or 12 month subscription within 30 days of the purchase of the 1 day subscription. The upgrade offer applies to upgrades from the 1 day (24 hours) subscription only to a 1, 6, or 12 month subscription. Subscriptions are non-transferable.

NB:The RootsIreland site offers the largest online collection of transcribed parish records for the island of Ireland, with some other collections which vary from county to county.

(With thanks to Karel Kiely)

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Tuesday, 17 May 2016

Historic mental health institutions in Scotland resources

The Scottish Indexes website, run by Graham and Emma Maxwell, has added a new dedicated page detailing known mental health institutions, and the locations of records (some of which they are indexing), which may help with your research.

From the site:

Over the past few centuries, many mental health institutions have operated in Scotland. It is relatively easy to find information regarding the large public asylums. Many smaller institutions also existed, some of which had only a few private patients. We aim to include as many of these as possible as we expand these pages. For the moment, the pages contain details of all licensed institutions operating when the 1857 report of the Royal Lunacy Commission was being prepared. The commission visited each licensed institution in Scotland, and the appendices of the report contain accounts of each of their visits, the text of which is to be found in these pages. We have also added pages for some other institutions which operated prior to 1857, and which opened later, but many still need to be added. We hope this serves as a starting point.

For details of institutions per each county, visit http://www.scottishindexes.com/institutions/countylist.aspx#c45

(Image: Murray Royal Lunatic Asylum, Scone, Perthshire)

Chris

My next Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course starts Monday 17th May - see http://pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Who Do You Think You Are June 2016 issue on sale

The June issue of Who Do You Think You Are magazine is now on sale.

Articles include 10 useful facts about parish registers, the history of the Royal Artillery, the battle of the Somme, estate records, overseas BMDs, the Police Gazette newspaper, stonemasons, resources in North London, and more.

For further information visit www.whodoyouthinkyouaremagazine.com.

Chris

My next Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course starts Monday 17th May - see http://pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

The Kirk considers digital baptism

So, err... this one's different. The Kirk, aka the Church of Scotland (www.churchofscotland.org.uk), is reported this morning to be considering the provision of online baptism, to  address the problem of declining congregations. The following is in today's Herald newspaper:

"THE Kirk is set to introduce online baptism for the first time as the clergy seeks new ways to address the needs of worshippers in a digital age. A landmark report backing the plans will be presented to 730 delegates, known as commissioners, at the Church of Scotland's annual gathering on The Mound in Edinburgh next week. The document will also include proposals to allow "access to the sacraments while not being physically present in the congregation". 

The full story is at http://www.heraldscotland.com/news/homenews/14496669.Kirk__to_introduce_online_baptism__in_bid_to_boost_membership/

COMMENT: As a genealogist who was actually baptised on board a nuclear submarine in Scotland in 1971, I honestly couldn't care less where people are baptised, if their parents so choose to have the rite performed - as long as there are records kept!


Chris

My next Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course starts Monday 17th May - see http://pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Family Tree June 2016 issue on sale

The latest edition of Family Tree magazine is now on sale:

Family Tree June is on sale now! With so many fascinating clues to be found; relations to interview, brick walls to conquer and free websites to explore there is always something new to discover, which is what we love about family history! This issue we’ll help you to make those discoveries without parting with a penny as we feature free websites for military history. Plus, we have seven key steps to help solve your brick walls, top 20 questions you need to ask your relations and our handy pull-out guide is the perfect way to start creating a life story by recording vital facts and precious memories.

Also inside this issue: marriage certificates; parish records; Devon FHS; Royal Mail history; newspapers; Huguenot weavers; your stories; & much, much more… Plus, free access to selected records at TheGenealogist!

  • 25 free military websites for family historians Simon Fowler gives you the lowdown on his favourite free websites to help you to trace your military ancestors and learn about their service.
  • This is the family history life story of… Create a wonderful family history keepsake using our exclusive pull-out guide.
  • Dissecting marriage certificates In our essential new series on civil registration records, David Annal explains how to gain valuable ancestral clues from marriage certificates – and spot those red herrings!
  • Interviewing relatives Relatives often have information that can help take your family tree back 100 years, as Rachel Bellerby explains in our beginner’s guide to carrying out a successful family history interview.
  • 7 steps for dealing with brick walls Chris Paton describes how brick walls can be as much of an opportunity as they can be a hindrance…
  • Secrets from the parish chest Join John Titford as he dusts off the parish records to uncover some treasured snippets.
  • Spotlight on… Devon Family History Society Celebrate family history societies and all they have to offer the family history world with our new feature by Rachel Bellerby, who starts with delightful Devon.

PLUS
  • First Post Ruth A Symes looks back over 500 years of the Royal Mail and our ancestors’ love affair with letters.
  • Memories & melodies Share in the family history memories of Valentine Jones and glean a few tips on writing up your own family’s tales.
  • Surprising seafarers… Discover a colourful tale of murders, trials, shipwrecks, romance and even cannibalism as Sarah Lee traces the Braggs of Cumberland.
  • In the news Val Davies flicks through the pages of history to reveal a rich seam of stories to be found in local newspapers about our ancestors’ lives… and demise.
  • My Huguenot weaving ancestors Refugees and economic migrants are nothing new, as Adèle Emm learned when she uncovered the story of the Sodo/Sodeau family and their fight for survival.
  • Commemoration street Sophie Pigott explores what happened to the families of one street during the Great War, revealing that their experiences were far from ordinary.
  • Twiglets Latest exploits from our tree-tracing diarist Gill Shaw.
  • Heroes of Ipswich Simon Wills talks to a couple of dedicated researchers about their war memorial project.
  • In search of Crusaders After finding Medieval graffiti within the walls of her home, Hilary Townsend set out to discover her knight in shining armour.
  • Thoughts on… Diane Lindsay enjoys a spot of photo restoration.

Regulars: Genealogy news; Dear Tom – genealogical miscellany; Your Q&A, including photo-dating & military advice; Reviews of the latest books, CDs & apps; Mailbox – your letters; Diary dates.

For further details visit http://family-tree.co.uk/2016/05/family-tree-june-2016/

Chris


My next Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course starts Monday 17th May - see http://pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Your Family History issue 169 on sale

Details of the latest Your Family History magazine:

Your Family History - May 2016

We’re looking at sport in our main feature this month. We live in an age of sedentary habits and an obesity crisis, so it’s rather salutary to look at the wide number of sporting activities our ancestors and nearer family members took part in, despite not having the hi-tech clothing or kit that we have today. They could face danger in their pursuits, as we explore, yet it did not stop them taking part.

Elsewhere in the magazine, we have a bit of a Scottish focus this month, both with Chris Paton’s feature on the digital collections held by the National Library of Scotland, and with Simon Wills’ fascinating look at the fishwives and fisher girls of the past. We also go to Jutland, with a lovely reader case study where one man’s memories of the 1916 battle are given, in his own words.

For further information visit http://subscribe.yourfamilyhistorymag.co.uk

Chris

My next Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course starts Monday 17th May - see http://pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Discover Your Ancestors 5th bookazine on sale

From Discover Your Ancestors (www.discoveryourancestors.co.uk), details of their latest annual bookazine:

Issue 5 of the critically acclaimed annual printed magazine Discover Your Ancestors is now available, featuring more than 190 pages of beautifully illustrated content to move your family history research on at pace. More than 30 stunning features on social history, places, military history and wartime, research advice and much more, delivered straight to your door.

Issue 5 is now available at more than 4,000 newsagents worldwide including WHSmith in the UK, Barnes & Noble in the USA and Chapters in Canada.

I have three features in this edition, one on the history of education in Scotland, another on how to research Irish ancestors who participated in events from 1912-1923 (now being commemorated as the Decade of Centenaries), and a third being a review of the TreeView software from S&N genealogy Ltd.

For further details visit www.discoveryourancestors.co.uk.

Chris

My next Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course starts Monday 17th May - see http://pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Sheffield and District Family History Fair

Sheffield and District Family History Society is running a family history fair on Saturday 21st May 2016, 10am-4pm, at the 1867 Lounge at Sheffield Wednesday Football Ground, Hillsborough, Sheffield, S6 1SW. There will be various exhibitors and talks throughout the day. Admission is £2, free entry for accompanied children.

For further details visit http://sheffieldfhs.org.uk/fair.htm

Chris

My next Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course starts Monday 17th May - see http://pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Monday, 16 May 2016

Sutton water rate books added to Ancestry

Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk) has added the following Surrey based collection:

Sutton, Surrey, England, Water Rate Books, 1868-1911
http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=60952

Rates were collected in each parish for support of the sick and poor, maintenance of roads and church, and other parish expenses. This database includes the records contained in 69 volumes of water rate registers held at the Sutton Borough Archives.

Within this database, you will be able to find the following information for each record:
  • Individual's name
  • Street Name
  • Date

Original data: Water Rate Books. London Borough of Sutton, Sutton, England.

Chris

My next Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course starts Monday 17th May - see http://pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Sunday, 15 May 2016

Forthcoming National Records of Scotland talks

The following talks are scheduled to take place at the National Records of Scotland (www.nrscotland.gov.uk) in Edinburgh:

3 June 2016, 2:00 - 3:00pm
Getting the most out of ScotlandsPeople
Iain Ferguson (ScotlandsPeople) will give a presentation, including hints and tips, on searching the records on the ScotlandsPeople search system. New Register House.

7 July 2016, 2:00 - 3:00pm
An introduction to the NRS maps and plans collections
Jane Brown, Head of Maps and Plans, National Records of Scotland, explores the rich variety of maps and plans held in NRS, the largest collection of hand-drawn plans relating to Scotland. New Register House.

22 July 2016, 2:00 - 3:00pm
Getting the most out of ScotlandsPeople
Iain Ferguson (ScotlandsPeople) will give a presentation, including hints and tips, on searching the records on the ScotlandsPeople search system. New Register House.

Further details at http://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/research/visit-us/events-talks-and-visits

Chris

My next Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course starts Monday 17th May - see http://pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Price increase on Northern Irish GENI website

Whilst I had noted previously on this blog that it was on the cards for the start of this month, I haven't as yet confirmed that it had happened - but after a day using the Northern Irish GRO's GENI website (https://geni.nidirect.gov.uk), the prices have now most definitely gone up! Credits now cost 50p each, up 10p from the previous 40p. One credit will allow you to see a partial transcript of births, marriages and deaths records, whilst 5 credits will allow you to see an image of the original full record - i.e. at a cost of £2.50, up from the previous £2 - subject to certain imposed online closure periods (births over 100 years, marriages over 75 years, deaths over 50).

Note that to get the best in terms of a basic free search on the site, without paying anything you can see dates and some other very basic data (e.g. mother's maiden name on birth records) but only if you have at least one credit on your account.

Chris

My next Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course starts Monday 17th May - see http://pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Saturday, 14 May 2016

TROVE newspapers database will add no more content

This is a story with a few weeks history under its belt already in Australia, but for those outside the continent who may not be aware, the National Library of Australia's world envied TROVE database (http://trove.nla.gov.au), which provides free access to Australian newspaper content (amongst other materials), is currently facing a major budget crisis, due to Australian government cuts to funding. Potential job losses are to come, and no further content is to be added to the site for the foreseeable future. For more on the story, visit http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-03-12/future-of-national-librarys-trove-online-database-in-doubt/7242182 and http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-05-05/national-library-trove-project-not-funded-to-add-to-collection/7377634.

TROVE is a world class resource - when family historians beyond Australia are asked to name a database from down under, it is usually the one that most folk will name first. The Australian government has clearly taken leave of its senses. Here's hoping they have a change of heart, and very soon, before they let one of their most prized international collections fall to ruin.


Chris

My next Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course starts Monday 17th May - see http://pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Ulster Historical Foundation books for sale

From the Ulster Historical Foundation (www.ancestryireland.com):

William Roulston’s Researching Scots Irish Ancestors

The Foundation is happy to report that William Roulston’s Researching Scots Irish Ancestors is now back in stock after selling out its 6th print run. This book is not merely a useful guide for researching your Ulster ancestors, it stands as the essential guide.

Dr Roulston’s book can claim to be the first comprehensive guide for family historians searching for ancestors, whether they are of English, Scottish or Gaelic Irish origin, in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Ulster.

In Researching Scots-Irish Ancestors a comprehensive range of sources from the period 1600-1800 are identified and explained in very clear terms. Information on the whereabouts of these records and how they may be accessed is also provided. Equally important, there is guidance on how effectively they might be used.

For more information or to purchase a copy of this great publication please go to: www.booksireland.org.uk/store/genealogical-guides/researching-scots-irish-ancestors-the-essential-genealogical-guide-to-early-modern-ulster

The Family History Web Directory: The Genealogical Websites You Can't Do Without by Jonathan Scott
Jonathan Scott's Family History Web Directory is an information-packed reference guide that distils the best of the internet into one easy-to-use format. Themed sections cover different topics, from 'getting started' to specific occupations, and there is an index reproducing all the websites in A-Z order. His handbook is a vital source for less experienced researchers, and a handy aide-memoire for more seasoned campaigners.

To purchase a copy of this publication please go to: www.booksireland.org.uk/store/genealogical-guides/family-history-web-directory-genealogical-websites-cant-without
Genealogical Research Guides


To mark the re-release of Researching Scots Irish Ancestors we would also like to draw your attention to two other popular genealogical research guides:

Tracing Your Irish Ancestors by John Grenham

John Grenham’s Tracing Your Irish Ancestors is acknowledged as the key reference guide to Irish family history research, especially for researching ancestors from southern Ireland. This 4th edition updates and improves the material previously included while adding new sources which have emerged since publication of the third edition in 2006.

This publication is a must have item for anyone researching ancestors from the island of Ireland. Order via http://www.booksireland.org.uk/store/all-departments/tracing-your-irish-ancestors


Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet: A guide for family historians by Chris Paton

Some guides to tracing family history on the internet can be hit and miss, but not this one. Chris Paton’s book is an excellent introduction and source of reference for anyone who is keen to trace their Irish roots by exploiting the increasing number of historical resources to be found on the internet. This guide is a top-rate companion volume to the Roulston and Grenham books. Order via http://www.booksireland.org.uk/store/all-departments/tracing-your-irish-family-history-on-the-internet


One hundred years ago

On the morning of May 12th 1916 the last of the signatories of the Irish Proclamation of Independence was executed by firing squad in Kilmainham Gaol, Dublin. Sentenced to death James Connolly famously had been so badly injured from the fighting during the uprising in Dublin that he had to be tied to a chair before being executed by firing squad.

The story of James Connolly, along with other prominent figures of the 1916 rising are examined in 1916: The Irish Rebellion (DVD). Narrated by award winning actor Liam Neeson, this three part landmark documentary series examines the 1916 Easter Rising in Dublin as well as placing the Irish Rising in its European and global contexts as anti-colonialism found its voice in the wake of the First World War.

For more information or to purchase a copy of this great publication please go to: www.booksireland.org.uk/store/cddvds/1916-irish-rebellion

Also available on this topic is Fearghal McGarry’s authoritative book, The Rising, Ireland: Easter 1916.

Now at the Printers - The Story of the Presbyterians in Ulster – Folding Map and Pocket History

This folding map/pocket history which looks at the story of Ulster's Presbyterians is now being printed and will be available in two weeks. To order a free copy of this map (P&P charges apply) please go to:

http://www.booksireland.org.uk/store/all-departments/presbyterians-ulster-map

(With thanks to the UHF in Belfast)

Chris

My next Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course starts Monday 17th May - see http://pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Friday, 13 May 2016

Restrictions on NRS sheriff court records

Thanks to Jack Davis via the LinkedIn page of the Scottish Genealogy Network (www.scottishgenealogynetwork.co.uk) for flagging up that the recent decision to restrict access to records at the National Records of Scotland (www.nrscotland.gov.uk) in fact goes considerably beyond divorce records.

The following Sheriff Courts records have in fact been restricted by a one hundred year closure period, as they may "contain sensitive personal data, as defined by the Data Protection Act 1998, the disclosure of which is likely to cause substantial damage or distress to the subject of the data":

• Criminal libels and indictments
• Records of criminal jury trials
• Juvenile court records
• High court circuit trial appearing before the sheriff court
• Divorces
• Family actions relating to children, e.g. separation; affiliation; paternity aliment; custody & access

As with any proposed research at an archive, it is worth enquiring in advance if the records of interest can be consulted.



(With thanks to Jack)

Chris

My next Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course starts Monday 17th May - see http://pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Has the National Archives stopped producing podcasts?

For the last few years, the National Archives (www.nationalarchives.gov.uk) in England has been uploading podcast recordings of various lectures and events. However, no lecture recordings appear to have gone online since December 22nd 2015, when Audrey Collins' useful hour long discussion Using the 1939 Register: Recording the UK population before the war was published on the site. Has TNA given up on presenting further podcasts?

The full range of podcasts on the archive's website can be accessed at http://media.nationalarchives.gov.uk, in the Audio category, and includes a range of useful lectures and recordings, all highly recommended. Various other media are also presented, including many film recordings that have been added this year.


Note that TNA's equivalent in Northern Ireland, PRONI, also carries recordings of lectures via its excellent YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/user/PRONIonline.

Chris

My next Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course starts Monday 17th May - see http://pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Australian Northern Territory probate index 1911-1994

If youyr ancestors emigrated to the Northern Territory in Australia, the following new release on Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk) might be of some assistance:

Northern Territory, Australia, Probate Index, 1911-1994
http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=60748

This index spans the years 1911 to 1994 and is organized first by year range, then alphabetically by surname and given name. Details provided for each deceased person can include:

* Name
* Address
* Occupation
* Administrator
* Date of Order
* Grant Type
* Reference Number


Source - Probate Index. Genealogical Society of the Northern Territory Inc.

Chris

My next Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course starts Monday 17th May - see http://pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Further London records released on FindmyPast

Some more London records have been released on FindmyPast (www.findmypast.com):

London Lives, Culture & Society, 1680-1817

Explore this rich archive of more than 1.5 million London records including criminal registers, apprentice records, coroner inquests, workhouse minutes, clerks' papers and much more.

The London Gazette, Supplements, August 1914-January 1920

This includes more than 40,000 announcements of armed forces promotions, appointments of official public offices, Royal proclamations and more.

Greater London Burial Index

Over 79,000 records that list your relative's name, age, occupation, religious denomination and burial location have been added to the Greater London Burial Index.

Further details at https://blog.findmypast.co.uk/fridays/



Chris

My next Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course starts Monday 17th May - see http://pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Sailortown maritime exhibition in Belfast

Also from PRONI (www.nidirect.gov.uk/proni), news of a new exhibition launch and talk in Belfast:

Monday 6th June, 1pm – PRONI is pleased to announce that David Snook will be launching his Sailortown Maritime exhibition as well as giving a talk on The merchant seamen of Sailortown, Belfast, 1918.

The is a fascinating exhibition of photographic identity cards, relating to merchant seamen from Sailortown working in home and foreign trade about 1918, with a talk exploring the administrative context of the ID record cards and the unique possibilities offered by the source in the making of family history for people with roots in a storied part of Belfast.

The Topic of Sailortown has proved to be very popular recently within PRONI so we would suggest reserving your place as soon as possible to avoid disappointment.


Chris

My next Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course starts Monday 17th May - see http://pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

PRONI fees consultation ending soon

From the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (www.nidirect.gov.uk/proni):

Consultation on Draft Statutory Rule - Public Use of the Records (Management and Fees) Rules (NI) 2016

The Department of Culture, Arts and Leisure (DCAL)/ Department for Communities (DFC) is seeking views on a draft Statutory Rule that deals with admission to the Public Record Office, the amounts of fees to be laid by the Office, and security of the documents.

In finalising the Statutory Rule, DCAL/DFC will take account of the comments it receives by 9.00am on Monday 23 May 2016.

The Consultation Paper can be accessed at https://www.communities-ni.gov.uk/consultations/proni-public-use-records-management-and-fees-rules-ni-2016 and responses can be submitted by email to proniconsultation@dcalni.gov.uk.

(With thanks to the PRONI Express)

Chris

My next Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course starts Monday 17th May - see http://pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Thursday, 12 May 2016

Dublin Metropolitan Police Prisoner Books 1905-1918

University College Dublin's Digital Library (http://digital.ucd.ie) has just uploaded digitised editions of four Dublin Metropolitan Police prisoners books from 1905-1908, and 1911-1918, at http://digital.ucd.ie/view/ucdlib:43945.

From the site, the following description:

Abstract: 
The Dublin Metropolitan Police (DMP) Prisoners Books for 1905-1908 and 1911-1918 are amongst the most valuable new documents to come to light on the revolutionary decade. They include important information on social and political life in the capital during the last years of the Union, from the period of widespread anticipation of Home Rule, to the advent of the 1913 Lockout, the outbreak of the First World War, the Easter Rising and its aftermath, including the conscription crisis of 1918. They will also be invaluable to those interested in criminology, genealogy, and family history.

Scope and content
The collection comprises of four large leather bound, double ledger volumes containing hand written entries that record the details of daily charge sheets issued by DMP members to offenders or alleged offenders. Each volume contains the name, age, address, occupation, alleged offence and, in most cases, outcome of cases involving over 30,000 people arrested by the DMP. Each volume also contains an index of prisoners with references to the pages containing details of the charge.

Three of the four volumes bear the title “Prisoners Book” and each page of arrest records has the running title “Prisoners charged with offences involving dishonesty”. Three of the volumes are numbered on the spine - the first volume in the collection as 1, the third as 4, and the fourth as 5. The third volume in the collection is missing the number on the spine, but as the entries in this volume are dated immediately before those in book number 4, it has been assumed that this volume was numbered as 3. There is a gap in the dates between the volume numbered as 1 and this volume, so it is assumed that there was a volume number 2. It is unknown whether this volume survives. Volume 1 records all those arrested from April 1st 1905 to January 1st 1908. The second volume (assumed to be number 3) runs from January 1st 1911 to September 30th 1913. Volume 4 contains the entries from October 1st 1913 to 31st December 1915. Volume 5 records the arrests from January 1st 1916 to September 30th 1918.

Each volume has a name index at the back - simply look up the name of interest, and if you find it there, look up the original entry at the page number directed to.

(With thanks to Claire Santry at http://www.irishgenealogynews.com/2016/05/dublin-metropolitan-polices-prisoners.html)

Chris

My next Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course starts Monday 17th May - see http://pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

British Newspaper Archive discounts offer

From the British Newspaper Archive (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk):

30% off the BNA
Get 30% off a 12 month subscription or 50% off pay per view credits by simply using the code MAY3050L at checkout. But don’t miss out, offer ends 20th May.

To redeem the offer visit https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/account/subscribe

NB: the site now has 14,236,403 pages online from 620 publications.

Chris

My next Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course starts Monday 17th May - see http://pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Scotland 1750-1850 course - still spaces available

The following short video gives an idea of what to expect from my next Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course from Pharos Teaching and Tutoting Litd, which kicks off Monday 17th May - the first group chat session will take place on Sunday 23rd. The course was orignally created by Sherry Irvine a few years back, and has been constantly updated by yours truly since then.It last for 5 weeks, costs £49.99, and we'll have regular chat sessions between students each week and a dedicated discussion forum throughout.

(In the video, please ignore the fact that I mention the next course starting in November - and the cost is now £49.99!)



(Also available online at https://youtu.be/fs6APm67x2Y)

For further details, and to sign up, please visit http://pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302 - still a few spaces available!

Chris

My next Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course starts Monday 17th May - see http://pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

National Library of Wales family history fair

From the National Library of Wales (www.llgc.org.uk), details of a family history fair on site in Aberystwyth this coming Saturday:

Thought about starting your own family history? Don’t know where to start? Why not pay a visit to the Family and Local History Fair to be held here at the National Library of Wales in Aberystwyth on Saturday, 14 May. It is the ideal place for a beginner to gain some knowledge of how to start researching, where to go and what is available.

This will be the third Fair held at the Library and again there will be over twenty stands in attendance in the Gregynog Gallery. As well as family history experts from the Library, county family history societies will be there to share their wealth of local knowledge, to sell their transcripts and indexes to parish registers, census returns and memorial inscriptions. Others will specialise in local history and the history of Wales. There will be plenty of books for sale – new ones relating to family and local history research, but also second hand books and maps. If you need help with photographs that is also covered as is photo restoration if yours have seen better days.

The fair will also have talks by Michael Freeman and William Troughton - further details at https://www.llgc.org.uk/blog/?p=11392.

(With thanks to the NLW)

Chris

My next Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course starts Monday 17th May - see http://pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html.

Wednesday, 11 May 2016

Bletchley Park podcast and Oral History Project

The latest podcast from Bletchley Park includes the story of the sinking of the Bismarck:

This month in the Bletchley Park Podcast’s It Happened Here series, we tell the story of The Bismarck. The iconic German battleship was sunk by the Royal Navy 75 years ago. While this clearly did not happen at Bletchley Park, but in the Atlantic Ocean, codebreaking and some of the pioneering techniques developed as part of it played a crucial role in locating the flagship of the German fleet.

Bletchley Park’s Research Historian, Dr David Kenyon, explains how work going on in wooden huts in the Buckinghamshire countryside contributed to the ship’s destruction, which was vital for the Allies, both strategically and symbolically.

Jane Fawcett worked in Hut 6 from 1940. She recalls “It may be the most important thing that any of us have ever done in our lives. We didn’t realise it at the time, but we do now.”

To hear the podcast please visit http://www.bletchleypark.org.uk/podcast/932393/The_Bismarck.html


Also, Bletchley Park is seeking more participants for its Oral History Project:

Since November 2011 we have visited over 300 Veterans to interview them and hear how enemy signals were intercepted, decrypted and turned into intelligence, as well as capturing fascinating glimpses of their daily lives. We have interviewed people who worked at Bletchley Park and in outstations from the north of Scotland to Australia. Their jobs highlight the broad range of roles people were fulfilling, from the upper echelons of Oxbridge academics via machines operators and clerical staff to cooks, cleaners and even delivery staff from the local bakery.

We are keen to interview anyone who worked:
  • At Bletchley Park or its outstations, civilian or military, in any role, however junior
  • In the Y services, in the UK and overseas
  • In SLUs or SCUs
  • In the Radio Security Service
  • In the development and construction of Colossus
  • In the construction and maintenance of Bombes
We would also like to hear from anyone who lived in the Bletchley area during the Second World War.

For further details visit http://www.bletchleypark.org.uk/content/hist/oralhistory.rhtm.

(With thanks to Bletchley Park)

Chris


For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html. My Pinterest account is at https://www.pinterest.com/chrismpaton/.

Latest Durham Records Online additions

Latest releases on Durham Records Online (http://durhamrecordsonline.com):

Durham St. Giles 1584-1700
At St. Giles in the city of Durham, from the beginning of the first register in 1584 to the end of 1700:
1,411 baptisms
594 marrages
1,602 burials


Marley Pots Cemetery (Southwick) 1901-1919
5,062 burials at Marley Pots Cemetery in Southwick (Sunderland district), from 7 Nov 1901 where our previous set left off, to the end of 1919.


1851 Gateshead census
14,404 people in the 1851 census of Gateshead added to our census collection. This is all of piece 2403 (446 folios), containing Barlow, Blaydon, Bleachgreen, Chopwell, Coalburns, Crawcrook, Derwent Haugh, Dunston, Fellside, Garesfield, Greenside, Hedgefield, High Spen, Marley Hill, Ryton, Shibdon, Star Gate, Stella, Swalwell, Teams, Whickham, and Winlaton.


Pittington burials 1574-1699
At Pittington St. Laurence in Durham district, we have reviewed & corrected our existing burial set prior to 1700 and added some new ones.

Coming Soon:
Sherburn Hospital baptisms & burials
Mere Knolls (Fulwell, Sunderland) burials 1940-1968
Newcastle St. John baptisms & burials
Jarrow marriage witnesses
Further down the queue: Newburn, Southwick baptisms, Darlington Friends Burial Ground, more Methodist records, Durham St. Nicholas baptisms & marriages 1540-1700, Slaley, Newcastle St Andrew, Heddon on the Wall, Auckland St. Andrew baptisms 1559-1653.

(With thanks to Durham Records Online)

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html. My Pinterest account is at https://www.pinterest.com/chrismpaton/.

Tuesday, 10 May 2016

Irish Family History Resources Online ebook offer

Genealogy eBooks is offering a 50% discount on my book Irish Family History Resources Online (2nd edition), throughout May. Here's the blurb:

50% discount during May 2016
Irish Family History Resources Online - by Chris Paton

$4.95 to 31 May 2016 (usual price $9.95)

There is a popular belief that Irish family history research is virtually impossible because 'all the records were burned in the civil war'. But as Northern Irish born family historian Chris Paton demonstrates, the glass is most definitely half full rather than half empty when it comes to research in the Emerald Isle. Many records still exist which can help with your ancestral pursuits, and for those unable to make their way to Ireland to carry out research, the internet is finally coming to the rescue, as more and more material is increasingly finding its way online by the day.

This revised and fully updated Unlock the Past guide explores the key repositories and records now available online, and will prove to you that if you have been put off with Irish research in the past, now is absolutely the time to take another look.


To purchase the ebook version of this title at half price visit http://www.gen-ebooks.com/irish-family-history-resources-online-2nd.html - the price is AU$4.95, about £2.52 in UK Sterling.

Chris

For details on my genealogy guide books, including A Decade of Irish Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-1923Discover Scottish Church Records (2nd edition), Discover Irish Land Records and Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html. My Pinterest account is at https://www.pinterest.com/chrismpaton/.